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International trade and worker flows: empirical evidence for Germany

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  • Daniel Baumgarten

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Abstract

Using a linked employer–employee data set for Germany, this paper studies how worker flows are related to establishments’ international trade involvement. Unconditional figures show that trading establishments have lower worker turnover rates than non-traders, suggesting a higher degree of employment stability. Conditional on an extensive set of control variables, exporting is further associated with a higher net job flow rate, which is almost entirely due to a lower separation rate (particularly for high-skilled workers and transitions into non-employment). In contrast, both an increase and a decrease in import intensity are (weakly) associated with a lower accession rate. These results are predominantly driven by smaller establishments, and they partly lose statistical significance once unobservable establishment characteristics are taken into account. Copyright Kiel Institute 2015

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  • Daniel Baumgarten, 2015. "International trade and worker flows: empirical evidence for Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(3), pages 589-608, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:151:y:2015:i:3:p:589-608
    DOI: 10.1007/s10290-015-0216-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Brändle, Tobias & Kalweit, René, 2016. "The Employment Effects of the EU Eastern Enlargement in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145502, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Marco Di Cintio & Sucharita Ghosh & Emanuele Grassi, 2016. "Firm Employment Growth, R&D Expenditures and Exports," Working Papers 2016.44, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Lindenthal, Volker, 2018. "The Volatility and Cyclicality of Job Flows in German Exporters and Non-Exporters," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181637, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Marco Di Cintio & Sucharita Ghosh & Emanuele Grassi, 2016. "Firm Employment Growth, R&D Expenditures and Exports," Working Papers 2016.44, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Andreas Hauptmann, 2019. "Worker turnover in German exporting establishments," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 1266-1271.
    6. Di Cintio, Marco & Ghosh, Sucharita & Grassi, Emanuele, 2017. "Firm growth, R&D expenditures and exports: An empirical analysis of italian SMEs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 836-852.
    7. Sébastien Lechevalier, 2015. "Globalization and labor market outcomes: de-industrialization, job security, and wage inequalities—introduction by guest editor," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(3), pages 405-408, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International trade; Worker turnover; Job turnover; Linked employer–employee data; F16; J21; J23; J63;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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