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School entry, afternoon care, and mothers’ labour supply

Author

Listed:
  • Ludovica Gambaro

    () (DIW Berlin
    UCL Institute of Education)

  • Jan Marcus

    () (DIW Berlin
    Universität Hamburg)

  • Frauke Peter

    () (DIW Berlin)

Abstract

The availability of childcare is a crucial factor for mothers’ labour force participation. While most of the literature examines childcare for preschool children, we specifically focus on primary school-aged children, estimating the effect of formal afternoon care on maternal labour supply. To do so, we use a novel matching technique, entropy balancing, and draw on the rich and longitudinal data of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). We show that children’s afternoon care increases mothers’ employment rates and their working hours. To confirm the robustness of our results, we conduct a series of sensitivity analyses and apply a newly proposed method to assess possible bias from omitted variables. Our findings highlight how childcare availability shapes maternal employment patterns well after school entry.

Suggested Citation

  • Ludovica Gambaro & Jan Marcus & Frauke Peter, 2019. "School entry, afternoon care, and mothers’ labour supply," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 769-803, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:57:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s00181-018-1462-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-018-1462-3
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    Cited by:

    1. Kamila Cygam-Rehm & Christoph Wunder, 2018. "Do Working Hours Affect Health? Evidence from Statutory Workweek Regulations in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 967, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Mathias Huebener & Sevrin Waights & C. Katharina Spiess & Nico A. Siegel & Gert G. Wagner, 2020. "Parental Well-Being in Times of Covid-19 in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 8487, CESifo.
    3. Huebener, Mathias & Pape, Astrid & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2019. "Parental Labour Supply Responses to the Abolition of Day Care Fees," IZA Discussion Papers 12780, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Fabian Dehos & Marie Paul, 2017. "The Effects of After-School Programs on Maternal Employment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 905, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Kamila Cygan-Rehm & Christoph Wunder, 2018. "Do Working Hours Affect Health? Evidence from Statutory Workweek Regulations in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 7098, CESifo.
    6. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Wunder, Christoph, 2018. "Do working hours affect health? Evidence from statutory workweek regulations in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 162-171.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Afternoon care; Maternal labour supply; All-day schools; Entropy balancing;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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