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Local Day-Care Quality and Maternal Employment: Evidence from East and West Germany

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  • Pia S. Schober
  • C. Katharina Spieß

Abstract

By investigating how locally available early childhood education and care quality relates to maternal employment choices, this study extended the literature which has mostly focused on the importance of day-care availability or costs. We provided differentiated analyses by the youngest child’s age and for West and East Germany to examine moderating influences of varying day-care supply and work-care cultures. The empirical analysis linked the Socio-Economic Panel and the ‘Families in Germany‘-Study for 2010 and 2011 (N=3,301 mothers) with regional structural quality data. We used regression models of employment status and work hours changes, respectively. In East Germany, mothers with a child aged under three years who lived in districts with smaller day-care groups were more likely to be employed and to extend their work hours. In West Germany, the negative association of child-teacher-ratios with maternal employment was marginally significant. For mothers with older children, day-care quality was unrelated to employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Pia S. Schober & C. Katharina Spieß, 2014. "Local Day-Care Quality and Maternal Employment: Evidence from East and West Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 649, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp649
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ludovica Gambaro & Jan Marcus & Frauke Peter, 2019. "School entry, afternoon care, and mothers’ labour supply," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 769-803, September.
    2. Zierow, Larissa, 2017. "Regulating Child Care Markets. Center-based Care vs. Family Day-Care in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168052, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Barbara Hofmann & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Arne Uhlendorff, 2017. "Job Displacement and First Birth Over the Business Cycle," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(3), pages 933-959, June.
    4. Boll, Christina & Lagemann, Andreas, 2017. "Public childcare and maternal labour supply: New evidence for Germany," HWWI Research Papers 180, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    5. Müller, Kai-Uwe & Wrohlich, Katharina & Sengül, Denise, 2016. "Does subsidized care for toddlers increase maternal labor supply? Evidence from a large-scale expansion of early childcare," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145654, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Kasrin, Zein & Smolny, Werner, 2019. "Female Labor Market Participation and Socioeconomic Development: Disentangling the U-Shaped Hypothesis," MPRA Paper 95561, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Stefan Bach & Jonas Jessen & Peter Haan & Frauke Peter & C. Katharina Spieß & Katharina Wrohlich & unter Mitwirkung von Niklas Isaak & Louisanne Knierim & Elena Ziege & Jan Marcus, 2020. "Fiskalische Wirkungen eines weiteren Ausbaus ganztägiger Betreuungsangebote für Kinder im Grundschulalter: Gutachten für das Bundesministerium für Familie, Senioren, Frauen und Jugend," DIW Berlin: Politikberatung kompakt, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, volume 127, number pbk146, September.

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    Keywords

    Child care; child care arrangements; education; early childhood; family policy; maternal employment;
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