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The effects of after-school programs on maternal employment

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  • Dehos, Fabian
  • Paul, Marie

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of a massive expansion of after-school programs (ASPs) on the labor market participation of mothers with primary school children in the West German context of relatively low full-time employment rates. Using an instrumental variables approach we exploit regional and temporal variation in the provision of federal ASP starting grants by a nationwide investment program. Results suggest that additional ASP places had no effect on working hours or the employment probability of mothers with primary school children.

Suggested Citation

  • Dehos, Fabian & Paul, Marie, 2017. "The effects of after-school programs on maternal employment," Ruhr Economic Papers 686, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:686
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nikki Shure, "undated". "School Hours and Maternal Labour Supply: A Natural Experiment from Germany," DoQSS Working Papers 16-13, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    2. Thomas Cornelissen & Christian Dustmann & Anna Raute & Uta Schönberg, 2018. "Who Benefits from Universal Child Care? Estimating Marginal Returns to Early Child Care Attendance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(6), pages 2356-2409.
    3. Stefan Bauernschuster & Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer, 2016. "Children Of A (Policy) Revolution: The Introduction Of Universal Child Care And Its Effect On Fertility," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 975-1005, August.
    4. Jonah B. Gelbach, 2002. "Public Schooling for Young Children and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 307-322, March.
    5. Ludovica Gambaro & Jan Marcus & Frauke Peter, 2019. "School entry, afternoon care, and mothers’ labour supply," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 769-803, September.
    6. Arnstein Aassve & Bruno Arpino & Alice Goisis, 2012. "Grandparenting and mothers’ labour force participation: A comparative analysis using the Generations and Gender Survey," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(3), pages 53-84.
    7. Helmut Rainer & Stefan Bauernschuster & Wolfgang Auer & Natalia Danzer & Mine Hancioglu & Bastian Hartmann & Timo Hener & Christian Holzner & Notburga Ott & Janina Reinkowski & Martin Werding, 2013. "Kinderbetreuung," ifo Forschungsberichte, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 59.
    8. Arnstein Aassve & Bruno Arpino & Alice Goisis, 2011. "Grandparenting and mothers√≠ labour force participation: A comparative analysis using the Generations and Gender Survey," Working Papers 036, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    9. Bauernschuster, Stefan & Schlotter, Martin, 2015. "Public child care and mothers' labor supply—Evidence from two quasi-experiments," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-16.
    10. Felfe, Christina & Lechner, Michael & Thiemann, Petra, 2016. "After-school care and parents' labor supply," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 64-75.
    11. Baker, Michael & Milligan, Kevin, 2008. "Maternal employment, breastfeeding, and health: Evidence from maternity leave mandates," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 871-887, July.
    12. Stefan Bauernschuster & Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer, 2016. "Children Of A (Policy) Revolution: The Introduction Of Universal Child Care And Its Effect On Fertility," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 975-1005, August.
    13. Janina Nemitz, 2015. "The effect of all-day primary school programs on maternal labor supply," ECON - Working Papers 213, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    14. Marcus, Jan & Nemitz, Janina & Spieß, C. Katharina, 2016. "Veränderungen in der gruppenspezifischen Nutzung von ganztägigen Schulangeboten - Längsschnittanalysen für den Primarbereich," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 415-442.
    15. Elizabeth U. Cascio, 2009. "Maternal Labor Supply and the Introduction of Kindergartens into American Public Schools," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
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    Cited by:

    1. Gambaro, Ludovica & Marcus, Jan & Peter, Frauke, 2019. "School entry, afternoon care, and mothers' labour supply," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1435-8921.
    2. Kümmerling, Angelika & Postels, Dominik & Slomka, Christine, 2017. "Zufriedenheit mit der Arbeitszeit - wie kann sie gelingen? Eine Analyse der Arbeitszeiten nach Geschlecht und Statusgruppen," Working Paper Forschungsförderung 054, Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Düsseldorf.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Maternal employment; after-school programs; instrumental variables;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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