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Universal Childcare for the Youngest and the Maternal Labour Supply

Author

Listed:
  • Kunze, Astrid

    () (Norwegian School of Economics)

  • Liu, Xingfei

    () (University of Alberta, Department of Economics)

Abstract

This paper explores whether the expansion of childcare leads to an increase in the maternal labour supply. Exploiting a large nationwide reform that expanded childcare for 1–2-year-olds to 80 percent coverage, we find a significant increase in employment of mothers with young children, but only weak evidence of an increase in contracted hours of work. The adjustments are short-term effects of the reform. We also find substantial heterogeneity. The effects are relatively large for mothers post maternity leave, noteworthy on actual working hours. For mothers with more than one child, effects are strong in the long-term of the reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Kunze, Astrid & Liu, Xingfei, 2019. "Universal Childcare for the Youngest and the Maternal Labour Supply," Working Papers 2019-1, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:albaec:2019_001
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    File URL: https://sites.ualberta.ca/~econwps/2019/wp2019-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    childcare; female labour supply; contracted hours; actual hours; causal effects;

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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