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Children and Women's Hours of Work

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  • Gillian Paull

Abstract

The prevalence of women in part-time work continues to be a distinguishing feature of female employment in Britain. Using data from the BHPS, this article analyses the evolution of work hours for women and men during family formation and development. A substantial movement towards part-time work for women occurs with the first birth and continues steadily for ten years. The gender gap in hours subsequently diminishes but persists even after children have grown up. Births have little impact on men's hours, although there is some adjustment in the balance of work hours for couples following births and last school entry. Copyright 2008 The Author(s). Journal compilation Royal Economic Society 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Gillian Paull, 2008. "Children and Women's Hours of Work," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 8-27, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:118:y:2008:i:526:p:f8-f27
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-0297.2007.02114.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elsayed, A.E.A. & de Grip, A. & Fouarge, D., 2014. "Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    2. Wunder, Christoph & Heineck, Guido, 2013. "Working time preferences, hours mismatch and well-being of couples: Are there spillovers?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 244-252.
    3. F. Barigozzi & H. Cremer & K. Roeder, 2017. "Women's career choices, social norms and child care policies," Working Papers wp1094, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    4. Lia Pacelli & Silvia Pasqua & Claudia Villosio, 2013. "Labor Market Penalties for Mothers in Italy," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 408-432, December.
    5. Ludovica Gambaro & Jan Marcus & Frauke H. Peter, 2016. "School Entry, Afternoon Care and Mothers' Labour Supply," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1622, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Cemal Eren Arbath & Quamral H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2018. "Diversity and Conflict," Working Papers 2018-6, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    7. Cem Baslevent, 2014. "The Work-Life Conflict and Well-Being of Turkish Employees," Working Papers 827, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2014.
    8. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2014. "The Impact of Deviations from Desired Hours of Work on the Life Satisfaction of Employees," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(1), pages 33-43, August.
    9. David McClendon & Janet Kuo & R. Raley, 2014. "Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(4), pages 1319-1344, August.
    10. repec:zbw:espost:169352 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Tomás Rau B., 2010. "Part-Time Work in Chile," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 13(1), pages 39-59, April.
    12. Ochsen, Carsten, 2008. "Parental labor market success and children's education attainment," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 95, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
    13. Annemarie Künn-Nelen & Andries Grip & Didier Fouarge, 2015. "The Relation Between Maternal Work Hours and the Cognitive Development of Young School-Aged Children," De Economist, Springer, vol. 163(2), pages 203-232, June.
    14. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2017. "Gender Inequality in Europe and the Life Satisfaction of Working and Non-working Women," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 107-124, February.
    15. Cemal Eren Arbatli & Quamrul H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2018. "Diversity and Conflict," Discussion Papers 18-01, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

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