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Birth And Mortality Rates, Gender Division Of Labor, And Time Distribution In The Solow Growth Model

Listed author(s):
  • Zhang W.B.

The purpose of this study is to introduce endogenous population growth model into the Solow one sector growth model. The study proposes a dynamic interdependence between the birth rate, the mortality rate, the population, wealth accumulation, and time distribution between work, leisure and children caring. The production side and wealth accumulation are built on the Solow growth model. We base our modeling the population dynamics on the Haavelmo population model and the Barro-Becker fertility choice model. We synthesize these dynamic forces in a compact framework, using the utility function proposed by Zhang. The model describes a dynamic interdependence between population change, wealth accumulation, gender division of labor, and time distribution between work, leisure and children fostering. We simulate the model to demonstrate existence of equilibrium points and motion of the dynamic system. We also examine the effects of changes in the effects of changes in the propensity to have children, the propensity to save, woman’s propensity to pursue leisure activities, woman’s human capital and man’s emotional involvement in children caring.

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File URL: http://www.usc.es/econo/RGE/Vol24/rge24111.pdf
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Article provided by University of Santiago de Compostela. Faculty of Economics and Business. in its journal Revista Galega de Economía.

Volume (Year): 24 (2015)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 121-134

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Handle: RePEc:sdo:regaec:v:24:y:2015:i:1_11
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Web page: http://www.usc.es/econo/RGE/benvidag.htm

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