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Endogenous fertility in a growth model with public and private health expenditures

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  • Dimitrios Varvarigos

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  • Intan Zakaria

Abstract

We build an overlapping-generations model that incorporates endogenous fertility choices, in addition to public and private expenditures on health. Following the seminal analysis of Bhattacharya and Qiao (J Econ Dyn Control 31:2519–2535, 2007 ) we assume that the effect of public health investment is complementary to private health expenditures. We find that this effect reinforces the positive impact of the capital stock on aggregate saving. Furthermore, we show that this complementarity can provide an additional explanation behind a salient feature of demographic transition; that is, the fertility decline along the process of economic growth. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrios Varvarigos & Intan Zakaria, 2013. "Endogenous fertility in a growth model with public and private health expenditures," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 67-85, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:26:y:2013:i:1:p:67-85
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-012-0412-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2013. "A Theory of Demographic Transition and Fertility Rebound in the Process of Economic Development," Discussion Papers in Economics 13/19, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    2. Varvarigos, Dimitrios & Arsenis, Panagiotis, 2015. "Corruption, fertility, and human capital," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 145-162.
    3. Hosoya, Kei, 2014. "Public health infrastructure and growth: Ways to improve the inferior equilibrium under multiple equilibria," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 194-207.
    4. Kawagishi, Taketo & Nakamoto, Yasuhiro, 2016. "Dynamic Analysis of Health Status in a Small Open Economy," MPRA Paper 73859, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Luciano Fanti & Luca Gori & Fabio Tramontana, 2014. "Endogenous lifetime, accidental bequests and economic growth," Decisions in Economics and Finance, Springer;Associazione per la Matematica, vol. 37(1), pages 81-98, April.
    6. Brezis, Elise S. & Ferreira, Rodolphe Dos Santos, 2016. "Endogenous Fertility With A Sibship Size Effect," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(08), pages 2046-2066, December.
    7. KONDO Keisuke, 2015. "Does Agglomeration Discourage Fertility? Evidence from the Japanese General Social Survey 2000-2010," Discussion papers 15067, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2016. "Population Growth And Preference Change In A Generalized Solow Growth Model With Gender Time Distributions," Oradea Journal of Business and Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 7-30, September.
    9. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2016. "Endogenous Population Dynamics and Economic Growth with Free Trade between Countries," Social Sciences and Education Research Review, Department of Communication, Journalism and Education Sciences, University of Craiova, vol. 3(1), pages 3-30, May.
    10. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2017. "Economic Development and Environmental Change with Endogenous Birth and Mortality Rates," Asian Journal of Economic Modelling, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(1), pages 77-97, March.
    11. Robert Stelter, 2016. "Fertility and health insurance types in Germany," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016021, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    12. Karine Constant, 2015. "Environmental Policy and Inequality: A Matter of Life and Death," Working Papers halshs-01174052, HAL.
    13. Stauvermann, Peter J. & Ky, Sereyvath & Nam, Gi-Yu, 2013. "The Costs of Increasing the Fertility Rate in an Endogenous Growth Model," MPRA Paper 46381, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Zhang W.B., 2015. "Birth And Mortality Rates, Gender Division Of Labor, And Time Distribution In The Solow Growth Model," Revista Galega de Economía, University of Santiago de Compostela. Faculty of Economics and Business., vol. 24(1), pages 121-134.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Economic growth; Health expenditures; J13; O41;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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