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Working time regulation in France from 1996 to 2012

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  • Philippe Askenazy

Abstract

France, which is often seen as an unusual country with a rigid 35-hour working week, has experienced massive changes in its regulation of working time in recent decades, including a progressive removal of 35-hour working week laws. These changes have affected and continue to affect workplace organisation, working conditions, job creation, productivity and wages. The 35-hour working week policy represents a reduction in working time as well as a complex package that restructured French labour law and that opened up a great deal of space for social bargaining. This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of working time regulation and its political roots. It discusses the studies evaluating the 35-hour working week and examines some of the basic consequences of reversing this policy since 2002. It also highlights unexplored lines of research on this topic. Copyright , Oxford University Press.

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  • Philippe Askenazy, 2013. "Working time regulation in France from 1996 to 2012," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(2), pages 323-347.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:37:y:2013:i:2:p:323-347
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/bes084
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    Cited by:

    1. Marie-Louise Leroux & Grégory Ponthiere, 2016. "Working Time Regulation, Unequal Lifetimes and Fairness," CESifo Working Paper Series 6271, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. James Harrigan & Ariell Reshef & Farid Toubal, 2016. "The March of the Techies: Technology, Trade, and Job Polarization in France, 1994-2007," Working Papers 2016-15, CEPII research center.
    3. Daniele Checchi & Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Lara Vivian, 2016. "Are changes in the dispersion of hours worked a cause of increased earnings inequality?," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-34, December.
    4. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
    5. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economic Papers 4564, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    6. Hana Urbancová & Miroslava Navrátilová, 2016. "The Organization Of Working Hours Of Selected Employee Categories In Czech Businesses," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 61(211), pages 99-116, October -.
    7. Berniell, Maria Ines & Bietenbeck, Jan, 2017. "The Effect of Working Hours on Health," IZA Discussion Papers 10524, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics Papers ieep4, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    9. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 111, WWWforEurope.

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