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Worktime regulations and spousal labor supply

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  • Goux, Dominique
  • Maurin, Eric
  • Petrongolo, Barbara

Abstract

We study interdependencies in spousal labor supply by exploiting the design of the French workweek reduction, which introduced exogenous variation in one's spouse's labor supply, at constant earnings. Treated employees work on average two hours less per week. Husbands of treated women respond by reducing their labor supply by about half an hour, consistent with substantial leisure complementarity, and specifically cut the non usual component of their workweek, leaving usual hours unchanged. Women's response to their husband's treatment is instead weak and rarely statistically significant, possibly due to heavier constraints in the organization of their workweek.

Suggested Citation

  • Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2014. "Worktime regulations and spousal labor supply," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57365, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:57365
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/57365/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katrin Huber & Erwin Winkler, 2016. "All We Need is Love? Trade-Adjustment, Inequality, and the Role of the Partner," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 873, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Nicolas R. Ziebarth & Martin Karlsson, 2014. "The Effects Of Expanding The Generosity Of The Statutory Sickness Insurance System," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 208-230, March.
    3. Olsson, Martin & Skogman Thoursie, Peter, 2015. "Sickness insurance and spousal labour supply," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 41-54.
    4. Tien Manh Vu, 2015. "Home appliances and gender gap of time spent on unpaid housework: evidence using household data from Vietnam," OSIPP Discussion Paper 15E002, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    5. Richard Blundell & Luigi Pistaferri & Itay Saporta-Eksten, 2015. "Children, time allocation and consumption insurance," IFS Working Papers W15/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Bassanini, Andrea & Caroli, Eve, 2014. "Is work bad for health? The role of constraint vs choice," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1402, CEPREMAP.
    7. Jungmin Lee & Daiji Kawaguchi & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2012. "Aggregate Impacts of a Gift of Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 612-616, May.
    8. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Lee, Jungmin & Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2013. "A gift of time," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 205-216.
    9. Ayhan, Sinem H., 2014. "How Do Married Women Respond When Their Husbands Lose Their Jobs? Evidence from Turkey During the Recent Crisis," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100387, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Ayhan, Sinem H., 2015. "Evidence of Added Worker Effect from the 2008 Economic Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 8937, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Boyle, Melissa A. & Lahey, Joanna N., 2016. "Spousal labor market effects from government health insurance: Evidence from a veterans affairs expansion," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 63-76.
    12. Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2014. "The effect of overtime regulations on employment," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-89, October.
    13. repec:dau:papers:123456789/12483 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Kawaguchi, Daiji & Lee, Jungmin, 2017. "Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-12.
    15. Dominique Goux & Eric Maurin & Barbara Petrongolo, 2014. "Worktime Regulations and Spousal Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(1), pages 252-276, January.
    16. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_457 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Tzu-Ting Yang, 2016. "Family Labor Supply and the Timing of Cash Transfers: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 16-A012, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
    18. Simon Georges-Kot & Dominique Goux & Eric Maurin, 2017. "Following the Crowd: Leisure Complementarities beyond the Household," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(4), pages 1061-1088.
    19. Emma Tominey, 2013. "Maternity Leave and the Responsiveness of Female Labor Supply to a Household Shock," Discussion Papers 13/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
    20. Johan Hombert & Antoinette Schoar & David Sraer & David Thesmar, 2014. "Can Unemployment Insurance Spur Entrepreneurial Activity?," NBER Working Papers 20717, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Philippe Askenazy, 2013. "Working time regulation in France from 1996 to 2012," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(2), pages 323-347.
    22. Clara Champagne & Ariane Pailhé & Anne Solaz, 2015. "Le temps domestique et parental des hommes et des femmes : quels facteurs d'évolutions en 25 ans ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 478(1), pages 209-242.
    23. Bryan, Mark L. & Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Couples' Labour Supply Responses to Job Loss: Boom and Recession Compared," IZA Discussion Papers 7775, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    24. Bryan, Mark L. & Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Couples’ labour supply responses to job loss: boom and recession compared," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-20, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    25. Jorge González Chapela, 2015. "Split or straight? Evidence of the effects of work schedules on workers’ well-being, time use, and productivity," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 153-177, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

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