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Does Abundance of Natural Resources Impair Investments in Education? Case of Russian Regions


  • Vasilyeva, O.

    (Amur State University, Economic Research Institute, Russain Academy of Science Far East Branch, Blagoveshchensk, Russia)


Using panel data for Russian regions in 2004–2009, I find some evidence that everything else (including per capita GDP) being equal natural resource abundance is associated with lower public spending on education in Russian regions. Meanwhile I don’t find any connection between the total (including private) spending on education and natural resources wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Vasilyeva, O., 2012. "Does Abundance of Natural Resources Impair Investments in Education? Case of Russian Regions," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 67-81.
  • Handle: RePEc:nea:journl:y:2012:i:14:p:67-81

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Halvor Mehlum & Karl Moene & Ragnar Torvik, 2006. "Institutions and the Resource Curse," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(508), pages 1-20, January.
    2. Gylfason, Thorvaldur, 2001. "Natural resources, education, and economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 847-859, May.
    3. James, Alex & Aadland, David, 2011. "The curse of natural resources: An empirical investigation of U.S. counties," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 440-453, May.
    4. Stijns, Jean-Philippe, 2006. "Natural resource abundance and human capital accumulation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1060-1083, June.
    5. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-848, December.
    6. Michael Alexeev & Robert Conrad, 2009. "The Elusive Curse of Oil," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(3), pages 586-598, August.
    7. O. Vasilieva., 2011. "Human Capital Accumulation and Resource Abundance," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 12.
    8. Papyrakis, Elissaios & Gerlagh, Reyer, 2007. "Resource abundance and economic growth in the United States," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(4), pages 1011-1039, May.
    9. Mishura, A., 2010. "Resource Dependence and Quality of Institutes in Russian Regions," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, issue 6, pages 82-96.
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    Cited by:

    1. Libman, Alexander, 2013. "Natural resources and sub-national economic performance: Does sub-national democracy matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 82-99.

    More about this item


    human capital; education; natural resource; natural resource curse;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy


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