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Who Participates in Labor-Intensive Public Works in Sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from Rural Botswana and Kenya

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  • Teklu, Tesfaye
  • Asefa, Sisay

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  • Teklu, Tesfaye & Asefa, Sisay, 1999. "Who Participates in Labor-Intensive Public Works in Sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from Rural Botswana and Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 431-438, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:27:y:1999:i:2:p:431-438
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Watanabe, Barbara & Mueller, Eva, 1984. "A poverty profile for rural Botswana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 115-127, February.
    2. Teklu, Tesfaye & Asefa, Sisay, 1997. "Factors Affecting Employment Choice in a Labor-Intensive Public Works Scheme in Rural Botswana," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(1), pages 175-186, October.
    3. Lucas, Robert E B & Stark, Oded, 1985. "Motivations to Remit: Evidence from Botswana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 901-918, October.
    4. Kossoudji, Sherrie & Mueller, Eva, 1983. "The Economic and Demographic Status of Female-Headed Households in Rural Botswana," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(4), pages 831-859, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Holden, Stein & Barrett, Christopher B. & Hagos, Fitsum, 2006. "Food-for-work for poverty reduction and the promotion of sustainable land use: can it work?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(01), pages 15-38, February.
    2. Basu, Arnab K. & Chau, Nancy H. & Kanbur, Ravi, 2009. "A theory of employment guarantees: Contestability, credibility and distributional concerns," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(3-4), pages 482-497, April.
    3. Barrett, Christopher B. & Holden, Stein & Clay, Daniel C., 2002. "Can Food-for-Work Programmes Reduce Vulnerability?," WIDER Working Paper Series 024, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Christopher Barrett & Daniel Clay, 2003. "How Accurate is Food-for-Work Self-Targeting in the Presence of Imperfect Factor Markets? Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 152-180.
    5. Agrawal, Arun & Gupta, Krishna, 2005. "Decentralization and Participation: The Governance of Common Pool Resources in Nepal's Terai," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1101-1114, July.
    6. Zant, Wouter, 2012. "The economics of food aid under subsistence farming with an application to Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 124-141.

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