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Business cycle stylized facts and inventory behaviour: New evidence for the Euro area

  • Cesaroni, Tatiana
  • Maccini, Louis
  • Malgarini, Marco

The purpose of this paper is for the first time to use Business Tendency Survey data, first, to identify new facts that are useful for the interpretation of the decline in the volatility of real activity in the Euro area, and, second, to test the inventory management hypothesis as an explanation for the Great Moderation in Europe. We present stylized facts from the Business Tendency data on series for inventories, current production, current orders, and expected production for the Euro area, emphasizing the decline in the volatility of the series. Further, we investigate whether the decline in inventory volatility can be attributed to an endogenous change in the persistence of shocks to the accumulation dynamics of inventories or to an exogenous change in the shocks hitting the inventory optimisation process. Our results at Euro level generally indicate that there is no evidence of a break in the inventory accumulation process. On the contrary, the impact of exogenous shocks on inventory volatility appears to be steadily declining over time, beginning from the mid-1980s.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Journal of Production Economics.

Volume (Year): 133 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (September)
Pages: 12-24

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Handle: RePEc:eee:proeco:v:133:y:2011:i:1:p:12-24
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijpe

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