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The Long and Large Decline in U.S. Output Volatility

Author

Listed:
  • Olivier Blanchard

    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

  • John Simon

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Blanchard & John Simon, 2001. "The Long and Large Decline in U.S. Output Volatility," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 135-174.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:32:y:2001:i:2001-1:p:135-174
    as

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    File URL: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2001/01/2001a_bpea_blanchard.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Balke, Nathan S & Gordon, Robert J, 1989. "The Estimation of Prewar Gross National Product: Methodology and New Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(1), pages 38-92, February.
    2. Margaret M. McConnell & Gabriel Perez-Quiros, 2000. "Output fluctuations in the United States: what has changed since the early 1980s?," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
    3. Romer, Christina D, 1986. "Is the Stabilization of the Postwar Economy a Figment of the Data?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 314-334, June.
    4. Weir, David R., 1986. "The Reliability of Historical Macroeconomic Data for Comparing Cyclical Stability," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(2), pages 353-365, June.
    5. George L. Perry & Charles L. Schultze, 1993. "Was This Recession Different? Are They All Different?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 24(1), pages 145-212.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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