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The application of trade and growth theories to agriculture: a survey

  • van Berkum, Siemen
  • van Meijl, Hans

This article reviews a broad range of theoretical concepts available to explain international trade in agricultural and food products. For many years agricultural trade analyses were largely based on traditional perceptions of comparative advantage following neoclassical theory. Observations of agricultural trade suggest, however, that concepts from modern trade and growth theories are increasingly relevant. This survey demonstrates that many opportunities exist for applying these new theories to the modern food economy.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/117851
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Article provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its journal Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 44 (2000)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:117851
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