IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/tcd/tcduee/tep1119.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Financial Flows Centrality: Empirical Evidence using Bilateral Capital Flows

Author

Listed:
  • Rogelio Mercado Jr.

    () (South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre)

  • Shanty Noviantie

    () (South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre)

Abstract

This paper uses a dataset on bilateral capital flows to construct a financial centrality measure for 64 advanced and emerging economies from 2000-16 to capture an economy’s importance within the global financial flows network. The results highlight the varying significance of network systemic and idiosyncratic factors in explaining financial centrality across different types of investments and residency of investors. Most notably, the findings show that financial centres have deeper and more developed financial system, implying their importance in global financial intermediation.

Suggested Citation

  • Rogelio Mercado Jr. & Shanty Noviantie, 2019. "Financial Flows Centrality: Empirical Evidence using Bilateral Capital Flows," Trinity Economics Papers tep1119, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep1119
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2019/TEP1119.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
    2. Ewald Engelen & Michael H. Grote, 2009. "Stock exchange virtualisation and the decline of second-tier financial centres--the cases of Amsterdam and Frankfurt," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(5), pages 679-696, September.
    3. Portes, Richard & Rey, Helene, 2005. "The determinants of cross-border equity flows," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 269-296, March.
    4. D. Garlaschelli & T. Di Matteo & T. Aste & G. Caldarelli & M. I. Loffredo, 2007. "Interplay between topology and dynamics in the World Trade Web," Papers physics/0701030, arXiv.org.
    5. Diebold, Francis X. & Yılmaz, Kamil, 2014. "On the network topology of variance decompositions: Measuring the connectedness of financial firms," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 182(1), pages 119-134.
    6. Mert Demirer & Francis X. Diebold & Laura Liu & Kamil Yilmaz, 2018. "Estimating global bank network connectedness," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(1), pages 1-15, January.
    7. Rogelio Mercado Jr., 2018. "Bilateral Capital Flows: Transaction Patterns and Gravity," Working Papers wp30, South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre.
    8. Philip R. Lane & Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, 2018. "The External Wealth of Nations Revisited: International Financial Integration in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 66(1), pages 189-222, March.
    9. Hélène Rey, 2016. "International Channels of Transmission of Monetary Policy and the Mundellian Trilemma," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(1), pages 6-35, May.
    10. Rogelio Mercado Jr, 2020. "Bilateral capital flows: gravity, push, and pull," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.),Bridging measurement challenges and analytical needs of external statistics: evolution or revolution?, volume 52, Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Hale, Galina, 2012. "Bank relationships, business cycles, and financial crises," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 312-325.
    12. in 't Veld, Daan & van der Leij, Marco & Hommes, Cars, 2020. "The formation of a core-periphery structure in heterogeneous financial networks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 119(C).
    13. Giordani, Paolo E. & Ruta, Michele & Weisfeld, Hans & Zhu, Ling, 2017. "Capital flow deflection," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 102-118.
    14. Fratzscher, Marcel, 2012. "Capital flows, push versus pull factors and the global financial crisis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 341-356.
    15. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen Reinhart, 2003. "The Center and the Periphery: The Globalization of Financial Turmoil," NBER Working Papers 9479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Michael D. Bordo & Marc Flandreau, 2003. "Core, Periphery, Exchange Rate Regimes, and Globalization," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 417-472, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Rogelio V. Mercado & Cyn-Young Park, 2011. "What Drives Different Types of Capital Flows and their Volatilities in Developing Asia?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 655-680, December.
    18. Battiston, Stefano & Delli Gatti, Domenico & Gallegati, Mauro & Greenwald, Bruce & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2012. "Liaisons dangereuses: Increasing connectivity, risk sharing, and systemic risk," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1121-1141.
    19. Minoiu, Camelia & Reyes, Javier A., 2013. "A network analysis of global banking: 1978–2010," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 168-184.
    20. Byrne, Joseph P. & Fiess, Norbert, 2016. "International capital flows to emerging markets: National and global determinants," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 82-100.
    21. Calderón, César & Kubota, Megumi, 2013. "Sudden stops: Are global and local investors alike?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 122-142.
    22. D. Garlaschelli & T. Di Matteo & T. Aste & G. Caldarelli & M. I. Loffredo, 2007. "Interplay between topology and dynamics in the World Trade Web," The European Physical Journal B: Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer;EDP Sciences, vol. 57(2), pages 159-164, May.
    23. Akerman, Anders & Seim, Anna Larsson, 2014. "The global arms trade network 1950–2007," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 535-551.
    24. Craig, Ben & von Peter, Goetz, 2014. "Interbank tiering and money center banks," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 322-347.
    25. Forbes, Kristin J. & Warnock, Francis E., 2012. "Capital flow waves: Surges, stops, flight, and retrenchment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 235-251.
    26. Rogelio V. Mercado Jr, 2018. "Not all surges of gross capital inflows are alike," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(2), pages 326-347, May.
    27. Ahmed, Shaghil & Zlate, Andrei, 2014. "Capital flows to emerging market economies: A brave new world?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(PB), pages 221-248.
    28. Ding, Haoyuan & Jin, Yuying & Liu, Ziyuan & Xie, Wenjing, 2019. "The relationship between international trade and capital flow: A network perspective," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-11.
    29. Raja Kali & Javier Reyes, 2007. "The architecture of globalization: a network approach to international economic integration," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 38(4), pages 595-620, July.
    30. Battiston, Stefano & Gatti, Domenico Delli & Gallegati, Mauro & Greenwald, Bruce & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2012. "Default cascades: When does risk diversification increase stability?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 138-149.
    31. Li, Suxiao & de Haan, Jakob & Scholtens, Bert, 2018. "Surges of international fund flows," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 97-119.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial centrality; financial depth; network analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep1119. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Colette Angelov). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/detcdie.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.