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The Capital Inflow “Problem” Revisited

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  • Reinhart, Carmen
  • Reinhart, Vincent

Abstract

Capital inflows can be a mixed blessing, especially in economies with thin domestic financial markets and when driven by investors with a short-term focus. Many levers of policy can be applied to resist the effects of the inflows. One that has been widely relied upon has been currency intervention. Key to that appears to be keeping their bilateral exchange rate stable vis-à-vis the U.S. dollar. But this requires them to resist currency appreciation and accumulate dollar reserves when the anchor country is mired in financial problems and keeps monetary policy accommodative in an unprecedented manner. The willingness of emerging market economies to limit exchange rate fluctuations will be tested as monetary policy in advanced economies remains geared toward domestic considerations. Meanwhile, some advanced economies will be looking to finance large deficits and to roll over large debts. In that environment, prior reticence toward capital controls and other restrictions on finance may well lift. For emerging markets, this insulates them from monetary policy in advanced economies that may be inappropriate for domestic circumstances. For advanced economies, this limits the competition for the debt they dearly have to sell. In such a world, the policy tools we discussed will be increasingly relied upon.

Suggested Citation

  • Reinhart, Carmen & Reinhart, Vincent, 2011. "The Capital Inflow “Problem” Revisited," MPRA Paper 29537, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29537
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/29537/1/MPRA_paper_29537.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408.
    2. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1994. "The Capital Inflows Problem: Concepts And Issues," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(3), pages 54-66, July.
    3. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Preface," MPRA Paper 17451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Carmen M. Reinhart and Vincent R. Reinhart, 2011. "Limits of Monetary Policy in Theory and Practice," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 31(3), pages 427-439, Fall.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eduardo Moron & Juan F. Castro, 2002. "Uncovering Central Bank Monetary Policy Objectives: Going Beyond Fear of Floating," Macroeconomics 0205002, EconWPA.
    2. Davis, J. Scott, 2015. "The macroeconomic effects of debt- and equity-based capital inflows," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 81-95.
    3. Glaessner, Thomas Charles & Oks, Daniel, 1998. "NAFTA, capital mobility, and Mexico's financial system," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1984, The World Bank.
    4. Ramon Moreno & Gloria Pasadilla & Eli Remolona, 1998. "Asia's financial crisis: lessons and policy responses," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 98-02, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital flows; reserves; exchange rates; capital controls;

    JEL classification:

    • F40 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - General
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General

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