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Capital Flow Bonanzas: An Encompassing View of the Past and Present

In: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2008

  • Carmen Reinhart
  • Vincent Reinhart

The standard pattern: capital flows into the new “hot” nation, but then stop or reverses forcing painful adjustment. This column presents research based on such episodes from 181 nations during 1980-2007 and for a subset of 66 nations for the 1960-2007 period. If the pattern of the past few decades holds true, emerging market economies may be facing a darkening future.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Jeffrey Frankel & Christopher Pissarides, 2009. "NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2008," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number fran08-1, December.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 8229.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8229
    Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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