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International Fuel Tax Assessment: An Application to Chile

  • Parry, Ian


    (Resources for the Future)

  • Strand, Jon

Most developed and developing country governments levy taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel used by motor vehicles. However, outside of the United States and Europe, automobile and heavy truck externalities have not been quantified, so policymakers have little guidance on whether prevailing tax rates are anywhere close to their corrective levels. This paper develops a general approach for roughly gauging the magnitude of motor vehicle externalities, and hence the corrective tax on gasoline and diesel, for individual countries, based on pooling local data sources with extrapolations from U.S. data. The analysis is illustrated for the case of Chile, though it could be readily applied to other countries with appropriate data collection.

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Paper provided by Resources For the Future in its series Discussion Papers with number dp-10-07.

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Date of creation: 03 Feb 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-10-07
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  18. Parry, Ian W.H., 2006. "How Should Heavy-Duty Trucks Be Taxed?," Discussion Papers dp-06-23, Resources For the Future.
  19. Parry, Ian & Fischer, Carolyn & Harrington, Winston, 2004. "Should Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards Be Tightened?," Discussion Papers dp-04-53, Resources For the Future.
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