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Marriage, Children, and Labor Supply: Beliefs and Outcomes

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  • Yifan Gong
  • Ralph Stinebrickner
  • Todd R. Stinebrickner

Abstract

While a large literature is interested in the relationship between family and labor supply outcomes, little is known about the expectations of these objects at earlier stages. We examine these expectations, taking advantage of unique data from the Berea Panel Study. In addition to characterizing expectations, starting during college, the data details outcomes for ten years after graduation. On average, both male and female college students are well-informed about the future gender gap in labor supply. Gender differences in beliefs about this future gap are primarily explained by gender differences in beliefs about how future family outcomes are related to future labor supply. Methodological contributions come from an approach for addressing measurement error in survey questions and the recognition that expectations data, along with longitudinal data, can potentially help address endogeneity issues arising in the estimation of the causal effect of family on labor supply.

Suggested Citation

  • Yifan Gong & Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2019. "Marriage, Children, and Labor Supply: Beliefs and Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 26334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:26334
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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