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Policies and Programs to Improve Secondary Education in Developing Countries: A Review of the Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Clair Null
  • Clemencia Cosentino
  • Swetha Sridharan
  • Laura Meyer

Abstract

This white paper summarizes rigorous evidence on approaches to increasing participation, improving learning, and enhancing the relevance of secondary education in developing countries. It should be of particular interest to policymakers and implementers seeking to improve secondary school enrollment, quality and relevance.

Suggested Citation

  • Clair Null & Clemencia Cosentino & Swetha Sridharan & Laura Meyer, "undated". "Policies and Programs to Improve Secondary Education in Developing Countries: A Review of the Evidence," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 516e420e637c4851b15e6a3f6, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:516e420e637c4851b15e6a3f6c42c600
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    File URL: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/-/media/publications/pdfs/education/2017/psipse-review-of-the-evidence.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Secondary education; International education; Rigorous evidence; PSIPSE;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • F - International Economics
    • Z - Other Special Topics

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