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Worms at work: Long-run impacts of a child health investment

Author

Listed:
  • Sarah Baird

    (George Washington University)

  • Joan Hamory Hicks

    (University of California, Berkeley)

  • Michael Kremer

    (Harvard University)

  • Edward Miguel

    (University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

This study estimates long-run impacts of a child health investment, exploiting community-wide experimental variation in school-based deworming. The program increased education among women and labor supply among men, with accompanying shifts in labor market specialization. Ten years after deworming treatment, women who were eligible as girls are 25% more likely to have attended secondary school, halving the gender gap. They reallocate time from traditional agriculture into cash crops and entrepreneurship. Men who were eligible as boys stay enrolled for more years of primary school, work 17% more hours each week, spend more time in entrepreneurship, are more likely to hold manufacturing jobs, and miss one fewer meal per week. We estimate an annualized financial internal rate of return of at least 32.2%.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Baird & Joan Hamory Hicks & Michael Kremer & Edward Miguel, 2015. "Worms at work: Long-run impacts of a child health investment," Working Papers 2015-16, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2015-16
    as

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    File URL: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/2015WP/BairdIIEPWP201516.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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