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Worms at Work: Long-run Impacts of a Child Health Investment

Author

Listed:
  • Sarah Baird
  • Joan Hamory Hicks
  • Michael Kremer
  • Edward Miguel

Abstract

This study estimates long-run impacts of a child health investment, exploitingcommunity-wide experimental variation in school-based deworming. The programincreased labor supply among men and education among women, with accompanyingshifts in labor market specialization. Ten years after deworming treatment, menwho were eligible as boys stay enrolled for more years of primary school, work17% more hours each week, spend more time in nonagricultural self-employment,are more likely to hold manufacturing jobs, and miss one fewer meal per week.Women who were in treatment schools as girls are approximately one quarter morelikely to have attended secondary school, halving the gender gap. Theyreallocate time from traditional agriculture into cash crops and nonagriculturalself-employment. We estimate a conservative annualized financial internal rateof return to deworming of 32%, and show that mass deworming may generate more infuture government revenue than it costs in subsidies.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Baird & Joan Hamory Hicks & Michael Kremer & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Worms at Work: Long-run Impacts of a Child Health Investment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(4), pages 1637-1680.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:131:y:2016:i:4:p:1637-1680.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/qje/qjw022
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 13th November 2017
      by Sam Watson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-11-13 18:33:33

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen C. Smith & Ram Fishman & Vida BobicÌ & Munshi Sulaiman, "undated". "How Sustainable Are Benefits from Extension for Smallholder Farmers? Evidence from a Randomised Phase-Out of the BRAC Program in Uganda," Working Papers 2017-1, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Douglas Almond & Janet Currie & Valentina Duque, 2017. "Childhood Circumstances and Adult Outcomes: Act II," NBER Working Papers 23017, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Krämer, Marion & Kumar, Santosh & Vollmer, Sebastian, 2018. "Impact of delivering iron-fortified salt through a school feeding program on child health, education and cognition: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial in rural India," GLO Discussion Paper Series 203, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Bhalotra, S.; & Karlsson, M.; & Nilsson, T.; & Schwarz, N.;, 2018. "Infant Health, Cognitive Performance and Earnings: Evidence from Inception of the Welfare State in Sweden," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. De Hoop,Jacobus Joost & Friedman,Jed & Kandpal,Eeshani & Rosati,Furio Camillo, 2017. "Child schooling and child work in the presence of a partial education subsidy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8182, The World Bank.
    6. repec:eee:socmed:v:190:y:2017:i:c:p:237-246 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Payal Hathi & Sabrina Haque & Lovey Pant & Diane Coffey & Dean Spears, 2017. "Place and Child Health: The Interaction of Population Density and Sanitation in Developing Countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(1), pages 337-360, February.
    8. Clair Null & Clemencia Cosentino & Swetha Sridharan & Laura Meyer, "undated". "Policies and Programs to Improve Secondary Education in Developing Countries: A Review of the Evidence," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 516e420e637c4851b15e6a3f6, Mathematica Policy Research.

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