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Intersectoral Network-Based Channel of Aggregate TFP Shocks

Author

Listed:
  • Kristina Barauskaite

    () (Bank of Lithuania & ISM University of Management and Economics)

  • Anh D.M. Nguyen

    () (Bank of Lithuania & Vilnius University)

Abstract

This study investigates the role of intersectoral networks in the transmission of aggregate technology shocks to sectors’ growth. First, we develop a theoretical model to obtain insights into the propagation of shocks through input-output linkages, which suggests that the network effect arises via sectoral downstream linkages. We then quantitatively assess this theoretical implication with US manufacturing industries, where the aggregate technology shocks are derived from a dynamic factor model. We find that aggregate technology shocks lead to an increase in the output growth of the sector, both directly and indirectly via its intersectoral linkages. More interestingly, we document a crucial role of the intersectoral network channel, which contributes about 50 percent of the total effect. In addition, the network-based effect comes mostly from downstream linkages of sectors, which is broadly consistent with theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristina Barauskaite & Anh D.M. Nguyen, 2019. "Intersectoral Network-Based Channel of Aggregate TFP Shocks," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 63, Bank of Lithuania.
  • Handle: RePEc:lie:wpaper:63
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christoph E. Boehm & Aaron Flaaen & Nitya Pandalai-Nayar, 2019. "Input Linkages and the Transmission of Shocks: Firm-Level Evidence from the 2011 Tōhoku Earthquake," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 101(1), pages 60-75, March.
    2. Jordi Gali, 1999. "Technology, Employment, and the Business Cycle: Do Technology Shocks Explain Aggregate Fluctuations?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 249-271, March.
    3. Karadimitropoulou, Aikaterini & León-Ledesma, Miguel, 2013. "World, country, and sector factors in international business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2913-2927.
    4. Andrea Pozzi & Fabiano Schivardi, 2016. "Demand or productivity: what determines firm growth?," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 47(3), pages 608-630, August.
    5. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
    6. Jean-Noël Barrot & Julien Sauvagnat, 2016. "Input Specificity and the Propagation of Idiosyncratic Shocks in Production Networks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(3), pages 1543-1592.
    7. Michael Weber & Ali Ozdagli, 2016. "Monetary Policy Through Production Networks: Evidence from the Stock Market," 2016 Meeting Papers 148, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Stock, James H & Wright, Jonathan H & Yogo, Motohiro, 2002. "A Survey of Weak Instruments and Weak Identification in Generalized Method of Moments," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(4), pages 518-529, October.
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    10. repec:wly:emetrp:v:86:y:2018:i:2:p:559-589 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:aea:aejmac:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:119-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Javier Reyes & Rossitza Wooster & Stuart Shirrell, 2014. "Regional Trade Agreements and the Pattern of Trade: A Networks Approach," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(8), pages 1128-1151, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kristina Barauskaite & Anh D. M. Nguyen, 2019. "Direct and Network Effects of Idiosyncratic TFP Shocks," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 65, Bank of Lithuania.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Input-Output Linkages; Intersectoral Network; Business Cycle; Aggregate Technology Shocks; TFP; Manufacturing Industries; Productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

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