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Macroeconomics with Heterogeneous Agents and Input-Output Networks

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  • David Rezza Baqaee
  • Emmanuel Farhi

Abstract

The goal of this paper is to simultaneously unbundle two interacting reduced-form building blocks of traditional macroeconomic models: the representative agent and the aggregate production function. We introduce a broad class of disaggregated general equilibrium models with Heterogeneous Agents and Input-Output networks (HA-IO).We characterize their properties through two sets of results describing the propagation and the aggregation of shocks. Our results shed light on many seemingly disparate applied questions, such as: sectoral comovement in business cycles; factor-biased technical change in task-based models; structural transformation; the effects of corporate taxation; and the dependence of fiscal multipliers on the composition of government spending.

Suggested Citation

  • David Rezza Baqaee & Emmanuel Farhi, 2018. "Macroeconomics with Heterogeneous Agents and Input-Output Networks," NBER Working Papers 24684, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24684
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    1. Caraiani, Petre, 2019. "Oil shocks and production network structure: Evidence from the OECD," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
    2. Raffaele Giammetti & Alberto Russo & Mauro Gallegati, 2020. "Key sectors in input–output production networks: An application to Brexit," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 840-870, April.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles

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