IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/red/sed019/856.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Pipeline Pressures and Sectoral Inflation Dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Joris Tielens

    (KU Leuven)

Abstract

In a production network, shocks originating in individual sectors do not remain confined to individual sectors but permeate through the pricing chain. The notion of “pipeline pressures” alludes to this cascade effect. In this paper we provide a structural definition of pipeline pressures to inflation and use Bayesian techniques to infer their presence from quarterly U.S. data. We document two insights. (i) Due to price stickiness along the supply chain, we show that pipeline pressures take time to materialize which renders them an important source of inflation persistence. (ii) As we trace their origins to 35 disaggregate sectors, pipeline pressures are docu- mented to be a key source of headline/disaggregated inflation volatility. Finally, we contrast our results to the dynamic factor literature which has traditionally inter- preted the comovement of price indices arising from pipeline pressures as aggregate shocks. Our results highlight the role of sectoral shocks – joint with the production architecture – to understand the micro origins of disaggregate/headline inflation persistence/volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Joris Tielens, 2019. "Pipeline Pressures and Sectoral Inflation Dynamics," 2019 Meeting Papers 856, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed019:856
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2019/paper_856.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Andreasen, 2010. "How to Maximize the Likelihood Function for a DSGE Model," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 35(2), pages 127-154, February.
    2. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Trabandt, Mathias & Walentin, Karl, 2011. "Introducing financial frictions and unemployment into a small open economy model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 1999-2041.
    3. repec:aea:aejmac:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:254-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Iskrev, Nikolay, 2010. "Local identification in DSGE models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 189-202, March.
    5. Del Negro, Marco & Schorfheide, Frank, 2008. "Forming priors for DSGE models (and how it affects the assessment of nominal rigidities)," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1191-1208, October.
    6. Jae Won Lee & Carlos Carvalho, 2010. "Sectoral Price Facts in a Sticky-Price Model," 2010 Meeting Papers 997, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim & Mark Bils, 2013. "How Sticky Wages in Existing Jobs can affect Hiring," 2013 Meeting Papers 1162, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Pasten, Ernesto & Schoenle, Raphael & Weber, Michael, 2017. "Price rigidities and the granular origins of aggregate fluctuations," Working Paper Series 2102, European Central Bank.
    9. repec:eee:ecolet:v:165:y:2018:i:c:p:65-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Erceg, Christopher J. & Henderson, Dale W. & Levin, Andrew T., 2000. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 281-313, October.
    11. Emi Nakamura & Jón Steinsson, 2008. "Five Facts about Prices: A Reevaluation of Menu Cost Models," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(4), pages 1415-1464.
    12. Atalay, Enghin & Drautzburg, Thorsten & Wang, Zhenting, 2018. "Accounting for the sources of macroeconomic tail risks," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 65-69.
    13. Peneva, Ekaterina, 2011. "Some evidence on factor intensity and price rigidity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1652-1658, October.
    14. Enghin Atalay, 2017. "How Important Are Sectoral Shocks?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 254-280, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:sed019:856. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Zimmermann). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sedddea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.