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How Sticky Wages In Existing Jobs Can Affect Hiring

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  • Mark Bils

    (University of Rochester NBER)

  • Yongsung Chang

    (University of Rochester, Yonsei University)

  • Sun-Bin Kim

    (Yonsei University)

Abstract

We consider a matching model of employment with flexible wages for new hires, but sticky wages within matches. Unlike most models of sticky wages, we allow effort to re- spond if wages are too high or too low. In the Mortensen-Pissarides model, employment is not affected by wage stickiness in existing matches. But it is in our model. If wages of matched workers are stuck too high, firms require more effort, lowering the value of additional labor and reducing hiring. We find that effort's response can greatly increase wage inertia and the volatility of employment relative to that in measured productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Bils & Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim, 2016. "How Sticky Wages In Existing Jobs Can Affect Hiring," Working papers 2016rwp-91, Yonsei University, Yonsei Economics Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:yon:wpaper:2016rwp-91
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    Cited by:

    1. Redmond, Michael & Van Zandweghe, Willem, 2016. "The Lasting Damage from the Financial Crisis to U.S. Productivity," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 1-3, March.
    2. Marco Fongoni, 2018. "Workers' reciprocity and the (ir)relevance of wage cyclicality for the volatility of job creation," Working Papers 1809, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    3. Carlsson, Mikael & Westermark, Andreas, 2016. "Endogenous Separations, Wage Rigidities and Employment Volatility," Working Paper Series 326, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    4. Fernando Martins & Pedro Portugal, 2014. "Wage adjustments during a severe economic downturn," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    5. Andrew Snell & Heiko Stuber & Jonathan Thomas, 2018. "Downward Real Wage Rigidity and Equal Treatment Wage Contracts: Theory and Evidence," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 30, pages 265-284, October.
    6. Carlsson, Mikael & Westermark, Andreas, 2018. "Endogenous Separations, Wage Rigidities and Unemployment Volatility," Working Paper Series 2018:5, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    7. repec:eee:reecon:v:71:y:2017:i:3:p:422-440 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Lenno Uuskula, 2015. "Firm turnover and inflation dynamics," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2015-01, Bank of Estonia, revised 03 Feb 2015.
    9. Yicheng Wang, 2015. "Can Wage Dynamics in Long-term Employment Relationships Help Mitigate Financial Shocks?," 2015 Meeting Papers 1189, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Effort; Employment; Sticky Wages; Wage Inertia;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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