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The Lasting Damage from the Financial Crisis to U.S. Productivity

Listed author(s):
  • Redmond, Michael

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

  • Van Zandweghe, Willem

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

Michael Redmond and Willem Van Zandweghe find that tight credit conditions during the 2007–09 financial crisis dampened productivity, leaving it on a lower trajectory.

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File URL: https://www.kansascityfed.org/~/media/files/publicat/research/macrobulletins/mb16redmondvanzandweghe0329.pdf
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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in its journal Macro Bulletin.

Volume (Year): (2016)
Issue (Month): (March)
Pages: 1-3

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkmb:00039
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  1. Barry Eichengreen & Donghyun Park & Kwanho Shin, 2015. "The Global Productivity Slump: Common and Country-Specific Factors," NBER Working Papers 21556, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jeff E. Biddle, 2014. "Retrospectives: The Cyclical Behavior of Labor Productivity and the Emergence of the Labor Hoarding Concept," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(2), pages 197-212, Spring.
  3. Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim & Mark Bils, 2013. "How Sticky Wages in Existing Jobs can affect Hiring," 2013 Meeting Papers 1162, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Laurence Ball, 2014. "Long-term damage from the Great Recession in OECD countries," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 149-160, September.
  5. Pablo A. Guerron-Quintana & Ryo Jinnai, "undated". "Liquidity, Trends and the Great Recession," Working Papers e66, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
  6. John Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2013. "Who Creates Jobs? Small versus Large versus Young," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(2), pages 347-361, May.
  7. Diego Anzoategui & Diego Comin & Mark Gertler & Joseba Martinez, 2016. "Endogenous Technology Adoption and R&D as Sources of Business Cycle Persistence," NBER Working Papers 22005, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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