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Price rigidities and the granular origins of aggregate fluctuations

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  • Pasten, Ernosto
  • Schoenle, Raphael
  • Weber, Michael

Abstract

We study the ability of sectoral shocks to generate aggregate fluctuations in a multi-sector general equilibrium model featuring sectoral heterogeneity in price stickiness, sector size, and input-output linkages. We show fat-tailed distributions of sectoral size or network centrality are neither necessary nor sufficient for idiosyncratic shocks to generate aggregate fluctuations when the responsiveness of prices to shocks varies across sectors. We derive conditions under which a frictional origin of aggregate fluctuations arises, that is, when micro shocks contribute to aggregate fluctuations in an economy with heterogeneous price rigidities but equal sector size and network centrality across sectors. We calibrate a 341-sector version of the to the United States and a quantitatively large frictional effect. When we allow for heterogeneities in price rigidity, sector size, and network centrality, the effect of micro shocks on GDP volatility doubles relative to a frictionless economy. Heterogeneity in price rigidity also substantially changes the identity of the sectors from which GDP fluctuations originate.

Suggested Citation

  • Pasten, Ernosto & Schoenle, Raphael & Weber, Michael, 2018. "Price rigidities and the granular origins of aggregate fluctuations," Research Discussion Papers 3/2018, Bank of Finland.
  • Handle: RePEc:bof:bofrdp:2018_003
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Weber & Ali Ozdagli, 2016. "Monetary Policy Through Production Networks: Evidence from the Stock Market," 2016 Meeting Papers 148, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Mongey, Simon, 2017. "Market Structure and Monetary Non-neutrality," Staff Report 558, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    3. David Rezza Baqaee & Emmanuel Farhi, 2017. "Productivity and Misallocation in General Equilibrium," Discussion Papers 1735, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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