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Mister Sandman, Bring Me Good Marks! On the Relationship Between Sleep Quality and Academic Achievement

Author

Listed:
  • Baert, Stijn

    () (Ghent University)

  • Omey, Eddy

    () (Ghent University)

  • Verhaest, Dieter

    () (KU Leuven)

  • Vermeir, Aurélie

    () (Ghent University)

Abstract

This study assesses the relationship between sleep quality and academic achievement. We survey college students about their sleep quality by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) before the start of their first exam period at university. PSQI scores are matched with course marks in this first exam period. Instrumenting PSQI scores by sleep quality during secondary education, we find that increasing total sleep quality with one standard deviation leads to 4.85 percentage point higher course marks.

Suggested Citation

  • Baert, Stijn & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter & Vermeir, Aurélie, 2014. "Mister Sandman, Bring Me Good Marks! On the Relationship Between Sleep Quality and Academic Achievement," IZA Discussion Papers 8232, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8232
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stijn Baert & Sunčica Vujić & Simon Amez & Matteo Claeskens & Thomas Daman & Arno Maeckelberghe & Eddy Omey & Lieven De Marez, 2020. "Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: Correlation or Causal Relationship?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(1), pages 22-46, February.
    2. Amez, Simon & Vujić, Sunčica & De Marez, Lieven & Baert, Stijn, 2019. "Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: First Evidence from Longitudinal Data," GLO Discussion Paper Series 438, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Alan T. Piper, 2016. "Sleep duration and life satisfaction," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 63(4), pages 305-325, December.
    4. Schaffner, Markus & Sarkar, Jayanta & Torgler, Benno & Dulleck, Uwe, 2018. "The implications of daylight saving time: A quasi-natural experiment on cognitive performance and risk taking behaviour," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 390-400.
    5. Amez, Simon & Baert, Stijn, 2019. "Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: A Literature Review," IZA Discussion Papers 12723, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    academic achievement; economics of education; economics of health; economics of sleep; sleep quality;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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