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Does weight affect children's test scores and teacher assessments differently?

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  • Zavodny, Madeline

Abstract

The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity increased dramatically in the United States during the past three decades. This increase has adverse public health implications, but its implication for children's academic outcomes is less clear. This paper uses data from five waves of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten to examine how children's weight is related to their scores on standardized tests and to their teachers’ assessments of their academic ability. The results indicate that children's weight is more negatively related to teacher assessments of their academic performance than to test scores.

Suggested Citation

  • Zavodny, Madeline, 2013. "Does weight affect children's test scores and teacher assessments differently?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 135-145.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:34:y:2013:i:c:p:135-145 DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2013.02.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Sabia & Daniel Rees, 2015. "Body weight, mental health capital, and academic achievement," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 653-684, September.
    2. Lu, Yu-Lung & Chou, Stephen Jui-Hsien & Lin, Eric S., 2014. "Gender differences in the impact of weight status on academic performance: Evidence from adolescents in Taiwan," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 300-314.
    3. Rees, Daniel I. & Sabia, Joseph J., 2014. "The kid's speech: The effect of stuttering on human capital acquisition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 76-88.
    4. Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler, 2015. "Systematic differences across evaluation schemes and educational choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 41-55.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Childhood overweight; Obesity; Underweight; Test scores; Grades;

    JEL classification:

    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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