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Why Do Some Motorbike Riders Wear a Helmet and Others Don't? Evidence from Delhi, India

Author

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  • Grimm, Michael

    () (University of Passau)

  • Treibich, Carole

    () (Paris School of Economics)

Abstract

We focus on helmet use behavior among motorbike users in Delhi. We use a detailed data set collected for the purpose of the study. To guide our empirical analysis, we rely on a simple model in which drivers decide on self-protection and self-insurance. The empirical findings suggest that risk averse drivers are more likely to wear a helmet, there is no systematic effect on speed. Helmet use also increases with education. Drivers who show a higher awareness of road risks are both more likely to wear a helmet and to speed less. Controlling for risk awareness, we observe that drivers tend to compensate between speed and helmet use. The results can provide a basis for awareness-raising policies. Improvements to the road infrastructure bear the risk of leading to risk-compensating behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Grimm, Michael & Treibich, Carole, 2014. "Why Do Some Motorbike Riders Wear a Helmet and Others Don't? Evidence from Delhi, India," IZA Discussion Papers 8042, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8042
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bensch, Gunther & Grimm, Michael & Peters, Jörg, 2014. "Why Do Households Forego High Returns from Technology Adoption - Evidence from Improved Cook Stoves in Burkina Faso," Ruhr Economic Papers 498, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Carole Treibich, 2015. ""Your Money or Your Life !" The Influence of Injury and Fine Expectations on Helmet Adoption among Motorcyclists in Delhi," AMSE Working Papers 1546, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised 16 Nov 2015.
    3. repec:spr:hecrev:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s13561-017-0177-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bensch, Gunther & Grimm, Michael & Peters, Jörg, 2015. "Why do households forego high returns from technology adoption? Evidence from improved cooking stoves in Burkina Faso," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 187-205.
    5. Axel Demenet, 2016. "Health Shocks and Permanent Income Loss: the Household Business Channel," Working Papers DT/2016/11, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    6. Gunther Bensch & Michael Grimm & Jörg Peters, 2014. "Why Do Households Forego High Returns from Technology Adoption - Evidence from Improved Cook Stoves in Burkina Faso," Ruhr Economic Papers 0498, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    7. repec:eee:socmed:v:185:y:2017:i:c:p:147-157 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:zbw:rwirep:0498 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    India; self-insurance; road safety; helmet use; risky health behavior; self-protection; risk-taking behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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