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Fiscal Policy Multipliers in Small States

Author

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  • Ali Alichi
  • Mr. Ippei Shibata
  • Kadir Tanyeri

Abstract

Government debt in many small states has risen beyond sustainable levels and some governments are considering fiscal consolidation. This paper estimates fiscal policy multipliers for small states using two distinct models: an empirical forecast error model with data from 23 small states across the world; and a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) model calibrated to a hypothetical small state’s economy. The results suggest that fiscal policy using government current primary spending is ineffective, but using government investment is very potent in small states in affecting the level of their GDP over the medium term. These results are robust to different model specifications and characteristics of small states. Inability to affect GDP using current primary spending could be frustrating for policymakers when an expansionary policy is needed, but encouraging at the current juncture when many governments are considering fiscal consolidation. For the short term, however, multipliers for government current primary spending are larger and affected by imports as share of GDP, level of government debt, and position of the economy in the business cycle, among other factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali Alichi & Mr. Ippei Shibata & Kadir Tanyeri, 2019. "Fiscal Policy Multipliers in Small States," IMF Working Papers 2019/072, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:2019/072
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dynamic General Equilibrium modelling of tiny countries
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2020-08-11 14:47:26

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    2. Yannis Psycharis & Anastasia Panori & Dimitrios Athanasopoulos, 2022. "Public Investment and Regional Resilience: Empirical Evidence from the Greek Regions," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 113(1), pages 57-79, February.
    3. Saccone, Donatella & Posta, Pompeo Della & Marelli, Enrico & Signorelli, Marcello, 2022. "Public investment multipliers by functions of government: An empirical analysis for European countries," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 531-545.
    4. El Mostafa Bentour, 2022. "The effects of public debt accumulation and business cycle on government spending multipliers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(19), pages 2231-2256, April.
    5. Beau Soederhuizen & Rutger Teulings & Rob Luginbuhl, 2019. "Estimating the Impact of the Financial Cycle on Fiscal Policy," CPB Discussion Paper 398, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    6. Johannes Hermanus Kemp, 2020. "Empirical estimates of fiscal multipliers for South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-91, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Petrović, Pavle & Arsić, Milojko & Nojković, Aleksandra, 2021. "Increasing public investment can be an effective policy in bad times: Evidence from emerging EU economies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 580-597.

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