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Determinants Of Road Traffic Crash Fatalities Across Indian States

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  • Michael Grimm
  • Carole Treibich

Abstract

This article explores the determinants of road traffic crash fatalities in India. In addition to income, the analysis considers the sociodemographic population structure, motorization levels, road and health infrastructure and road rule enforcement as potential factors. An original panel data set covering 25 Indian states is analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Time and state fixed‐effects account for unobserved heterogeneity across states and time. The rising motorization, urbanization and accompanying increase in the share of vulnerable road users, that is, pedestrians and two‐wheelers, are the major drivers of road traffic crash fatalities in India. Among vulnerable road users, women form a particularly high‐risk group. Higher expenditure per police officer is associated with a lower fatality rate. The results suggest that India should focus, in particular, on road infrastructure investments that allow the separation of vulnerable from other road users on improved road rule enforcement and should pay special attention to vulnerable female road users. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Michael Grimm & Carole Treibich, 2013. "Determinants Of Road Traffic Crash Fatalities Across Indian States," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(8), pages 915-930, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:22:y:2013:i:8:p:915-930
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.2870
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    1. Castillo-Manzano, José I. & Castro-Nuño, Mercedes & Fageda, Xavier, 2015. "Are traffic violators criminals? Searching for answers in the experiences of European countries," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 86-94.
    2. Lin, Yi-Chen, 2016. "The global distribution of the burden of road traffic injuries: Evolution and intra-distribution mobility," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 77-91.
    3. Michael Grimm & Carole Treibich, 2013. "Why Do Some Bikers Wear a Helmet and Others Don't? Evidence from Delhi, India," AMSE Working Papers 1348, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France, revised 10 Oct 2013.
    4. Castillo-Manzano, José I. & Castro-Nuño, Mercedes & Fageda, Xavier, 2016. "Exploring the relationship between truck load capacity and traffic accidents in the European Union," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 94-109.
    5. José Castillo-Manzano & Mercedes Castro-Nuño & Xavier Fageda, 2014. "Can health public expenditure reduce the tragic consequences of road traffic accidents? The EU-27 experience," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(6), pages 645-652, July.
    6. Jones, Steven & Lidbe, Abhay & Hainen, Alex, 2019. "What can open access data from India tell us about road safety and sustainable development?," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 80(C).
    7. Grimm, Michael & Treibich, Carole, 2016. "Why do some motorbike riders wear a helmet and others don’t? Evidence from Delhi, India," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 318-336.
    8. Yueh-Tzu Lu & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2017. "Smeed fs Law and the Role of Hospitals in Modeling Fatalities and Traffic Accidents," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 17-22, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    9. Filippo Elba & Fiammetta Cosci & Anna Pettini & Federico M. Stefanini, 2018. "Adolescents on the Road: A Case Study of Determinants of Risky Behaviors," CESifo Working Paper Series 7144, CESifo.
    10. Yueh-Tzu Lu & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2019. "Smeed’s law and the role of hospitals in modeling traffic accidents and fatalities in Japan," Asia-Pacific Journal of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 319-332, June.
    11. Roesel, Felix, 2017. "The causal effect of wrong-hand drive vehicles on road safety," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 11, pages 15-22.
    12. Nishitateno, Shuhei & Burke, Paul J., 2014. "The motorcycle Kuznets curve," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 116-123.

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