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A Game Theoretical Approach to Road Safety

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  • Pål Andreas Pedersen

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Abstract

A theoretical model is adopted in order to explain incentives and actual safety behaviour for drivers, pedestrians and other road users which do not utilise motorised vehicles. A road user's outcome is supposed to be dependent on her individual actions and cares decided upon by other individuals utilising the roads simultaneously, as well as on external traffic safety conditions. By varying the types of road users meeting in traffic and the order of moves taken, several different games are identified, analysed and compared. In addition to focussing on the possible strategic interactions between the road users and the outcomes most likely to be found in different situations, we discuss the existence and size of moral hazard effects caused by improvements in external safety conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Pål Andreas Pedersen, 2001. "A Game Theoretical Approach to Road Safety," Studies in Economics 0105, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  • Handle: RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:0105
    as

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    File URL: ftp://ftp.ukc.ac.uk/pub/ejr/RePEc/ukc/ukcedp/0105.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peirson, John & Skinner, Ian & Vickerman, Roger, 1998. "The Microeconomic Analysis of the External Costs of Road Accidents," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(259), pages 429-440, August.
    2. Boyer, Marcel & Dionne, Georges, 1987. "The economics of road safety," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 413-431, October.
    3. Risa, Alf Erling, 1992. "Public Regulation of Private Accident Risk: The Moral Hazard of Technological Improvements," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 335-346, December.
    4. Gal-Or, Esther, 1985. "First Mover and Second Mover Advantages," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 26(3), pages 649-653, October.
    5. Peltzman, Sam, 1975. "The Effects of Automobile Safety Regulation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(4), pages 677-725, August.
    6. Bulow, Jeremy I & Geanakoplos, John D & Klemperer, Paul D, 1985. "Multimarket Oligopoly: Strategic Substitutes and Complements," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(3), pages 488-511, June.
    7. Dickerson, Andrew & Peirson, John & Vickerman, Roger, 2000. "Road Accidents and Traffic Flows: An Econometric Investigation," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(265), pages 101-121, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wsi:acsxxx:v:13:y:2010:i:03:n:s0219525910002591 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:wsi:jecxxx:v:14:y:2006:i:02:n:s021849580600009x is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:wsi:jecxxx:v:21:y:2013:i:02:n:s0218495813500088 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Amer, Rafael & Gimenez, Jose Miguel & Magana, Antonio, 2007. "Accessibility in oriented networks," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 180(2), pages 700-712, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Road safety; strategic interaction; moral hazard;

    JEL classification:

    • R4 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty

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