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Does Institutional Diversity Account for Pay Rules in Germany and Belgium?

  • Kampelmann, Stephan

    ()

    (Free University of Brussels)

  • Rycx, Francois

    ()

    (Free University of Brussels)

This paper examines the relationship between institutions and the remuneration of different jobs by comparing the German and Belgian labour markets with respect to a typology of institutions (social representations, norms, conventions, legislation, and organisations). The observed institutional differences between the two countries lead to the hypotheses of (I) higher overall pay inequality in Germany; (II) higher pay inequalities between employees and workers in Belgium; and (III) higher (lower) impact of educational credentials (work-post tenure) on earnings in Germany. We provide survey-based empirical evidence supporting hypotheses I and III, but find no evidence for hypothesis II. These results underline the importance of institutional details: although Germany and Belgium belong to the same "variety of capitalism", we provide evidence that small institutional disparities within Continental-European capitalism account for distinct structures of pay.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6010.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Socio-Economic Review, 2013, 11 (1), 131-157
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6010
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  1. Robert Gibbons & Lawrence F. Katz, 1989. "Does Unmeasured Ability Explain Inter-Industry Wage Differentials?," NBER Working Papers 3182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Katz, Lawrence F. & Autor, David H., 1999. "Changes in the wage structure and earnings inequality," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1463-1555 Elsevier.
  3. Philip Du Caju & Gábor Kátay & Ana Lamo & Daphne Nicolitsas & Steven Poelhekke, 2010. "Inter-industry wage differentials in EU countries : What do cross-country time-varying data add to the picture ?," Working Paper Research 189, National Bank of Belgium.
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  6. Du Caju, Philip & Rycx, François & Tojerow, Ilan, 2009. "Inter-industry wage differentials: how much does rent sharing matter?," Working Paper Series 1103, European Central Bank.
  7. Katherine G. Abraham & Susan N. Houseman, 1993. "Does Employment Protection Inhibit Labor Market Flexibility? Lessons from Germany, France and Belgium," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 93-16, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  8. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
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  11. Stephan Kampelmann, 2009. "Inequality Measures as Conventions: New Interpretations of a Classic Operationalization Problem," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/109410, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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