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More Female Manager Hires through More Female Managers? Evidence from Germany

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Listed:
  • Bossler, Mario

    () (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Nuremberg)

  • Mosthaf, Alexander

    () (University of Mainz)

  • Schank, Thorsten

    () (University of Mainz)

Abstract

This paper investigates if there is state dependence in the gender composition of managers in German establishments. We analyze whether the number of hired female managers (respectively the share of females within hired managers) depends on the past hiring decisions of an establishment. Using administrative data, we apply dynamic linear models and dynamic tobit models accounting for unobserved heterogeneity and the endogeneity of lagged dependent variables. We find that an increase of female manager hires in present leads to more female hired managers in the future. Similarly, the number of male manager hires also exhibits state dependence.

Suggested Citation

  • Bossler, Mario & Mosthaf, Alexander & Schank, Thorsten, 2016. "More Female Manager Hires through More Female Managers? Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 10240, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10240
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    female managers; gender discrimination; state dependence; dynamic panel data models;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation

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