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What are the Motivations of Pathways to Retirement in Europe: Individual, Familial, Professional Situation or Social Protection Systems?

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  • Thierry Debrand

    () (IRDES institut for research and information in health economics)

  • Nicolas Sirven

    ()

Abstract

The aim of this research is to identify the determinants of pathways to retirement in Europe and, by measuring the influence or combined influence of individual, contextual and institutional domains on labor force participation, to better understand inter-country variations in the employment rates of older citizens. The dataset consists of both the first two longitudinal waves of SHARE (2004-2006) and some macroeconomic series from the OECD describing three complementary social protection systems (pensions, disability, employment). The analysis is simultaneously carried out in terms of "stocks" (labor force participation in 2004) and "flows" (pathways from employment in 2004 to retirement in 2006). Indicators are developed to measure the contribution of each domain (individual, contextual, institutional), and their various combinations to the employment rate of older citizens, and their role in explaining inter-country differences. As expected, results demonstrate that labor force participation and the decision to retire are determined by the various individual and contextual domains with social protection systems, each playing a significant role. Institutional determinants explain most of the inter-country differences. There appears to be a complementary effect between the different categories of social protection, and the global effect of the three systems combined is greater than the sum of the idiosyncratic effect of each system. Future public policies aiming at increasing the workforce participation of older citizens should therefore take into account that retirement decisions are determined by complex, interactive and individual determinants, and that within the European Union, the main convergence factors are to be found in the differences in social protection systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Thierry Debrand & Nicolas Sirven, 2009. "What are the Motivations of Pathways to Retirement in Europe: Individual, Familial, Professional Situation or Social Protection Systems?," Working Papers DT28, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Oct 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:irh:wpaper:dt28
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2014. "The Effect of Non-Work Related Health Events on Career Outcomes: An Evaluation in the French Labor Market," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 124(3), pages 437-465.
    2. Thierry Debrand & Christine Sorasith, 2010. "Bouclier sanitaire : choisir entre égalité et équité ? Une analyse à partir du modèle ARAMMIS," Working Papers DT32, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Jun 2010.
    3. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2012. "The impact of health events on individual labor market histories : the message from difference in differences with exact matching," Working Papers halshs-00674560, HAL.
    4. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2014. "Chronic Illnesses and Injuries: An Evaluation of their Impact on Occupation and Revenues / Maladies chroniques et accidents : une évaluation de leur impact sur le parcours professionnel et les revenus," Working Papers halshs-00966970, HAL.
    5. Josephine Jacobs & Courtney Van Houtven & Audrey Laporte & Peter Coyte, 2014. "The Impact of Informal Caregiving Intensity on Women's Retirement in the United States," Working Papers 140008, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
    6. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Laporte, Audrey & Van Houtven, Courtney H. & Coyte, Peter C., 2014. "Caregiving intensity and retirement status in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 74-82.
    7. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2014. "The Impact of Health Events on Individual Labor Market Histories: the Message from Difference in Differences with Exact Matching / L'impact des événements de santé sur la carrière professionnelle : un," Working Papers halshs-00966963, HAL.
    8. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Thierry Debrand & Camille Regaert, 2012. "Sick Leaves: Understanding Disparities Between French Departments," Working Papers DT50, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Oct 2012.
    9. Janina Reinkowski, 2014. "Empirical Essays in the Economics of Ageing and the Economics of Innovation," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 53, June.
    10. Maciej Lis & Agnieszka Kamińska & Aart-Jan Riekhoff & Izabela Styczynska, 2013. "The Impact of Institutional and Socio-Ecological Drivers on Activity at Older Ages," CASE Network Reports 0115, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    11. Thierry Debrand & Christine Sorasith, 2010. "Out-of-Pocket Maximum Rules under a Compulsatory Health Care Insurance Scheme: A Choice between Equality and Equity," Working Papers DT34, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Nov 2010.
    12. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine le Clainche, 2012. "Chronic Illnesses and Injuries: An Evaluation of their Impact on Occupation and Revenues," Working Papers 12-02, LAMETA, Universitiy of Montpellier, revised Jan 2012.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Protection; Social Security; Retirement; Ageing; Health; Europe;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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