IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Impact of Institutional and Socio-Ecological Drivers on Activity at Older Ages

  • Maciej Lis
  • Agnieszka KamiÅ„ska
  • Aart-Jan Riekhoff
  • Izabela Styczynska

We present an insight of the socio-economic drivers of economic and noneconomic activity of persons 50+ as well their ability to adopt to SET. Not only the labour market participation, but also social engagement, beliefs, education, religious activities and housework are studied. With the use of European Social Survey data we investigate the general level of the activity among people aged 50+ in Europe as well as the relation between various aspects of activity and general labour market performance. We obtain mixed results on the concomitance of non-market and labour-market activities. We also check the role of personal traits as well as pull and push factors on prematurely leaving labour market in European countries. The differences among countries in terms of the results are confronted with the institutional characteristics of the countries. Finally, selected case studies of successful activation policies are presented.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.case-research.eu/sites/default/files/publications/CNR_2013_115_0.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research in its series CASE Network Reports with number 0115.

as
in new window

Length: 66 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sec:cnrepo:0115
Contact details of provider: Postal: Aleja Jana Pawla II, 61, 01-031 Warsaw
Phone: +48 22 206 29 00
Fax: +48 22 206 29 01
Web page: http://www.case-research.eu/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Laun, Lisa, 2012. "The effect of age-targeted tax credits on retirement behavior," Working Paper Series 2012:18, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  2. Dominique Anxo & Thomas Ericson & Annie Jolivet, 2012. "Working longer in European countries: underestimated and unexpected effects," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(6), pages 612-628, May.
  3. Lukas Inderbitzin & Stefan Staubli & Josef Zweimüller, 2013. "Extended unemployment benefits and early retirement: program complementarity and program substitution," ECON - Working Papers 119, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  4. Romain Duval, 2003. "Retirement Behaviour in OECD Countries: Impact of Old-Age Pension Schemes and other Social Transfer Programmes," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2003(2), pages 7-50.
  5. Monika Riedel & Helmut Hofer, 2013. "Determinants of the Transition from Work into Retirement," NRN working papers 2013-10, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  6. Thierry Debrand & Nicolas Sirven, 2009. "What are the Motivations of Pathways to Retirement in Europe: Individual, Familial, Professional Situation or Social Protection Systems?," Working Papers DT28, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Oct 2009.
  7. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 2004. "Minimum Hours Constraints, Job Requirements and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 10876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Didier Fouarge & Trudie Schils, 2009. "The Effect of Early Retirement Incentives on the Training Participation of Older Workers," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 85-109, 03.
  9. Karlström, Anders & Palme, Mårten & Svensson, Ingemar, 2008. "The employment effect of stricter rules for eligibility for DI: Evidence from a natural experiment in Sweden," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(10-11), pages 2071-2082, October.
  10. Klaas de Vos & Arie Kapteyn & Adriaan Kalwij, 2011. "Disability Insurance and Labor Market Exit Routes of Older Workers in The Netherlands," NBER Working Papers 17053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Jonathan Gruber & David Wise, 1997. "Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Introduction and Summary of Papers by..," NBER Working Papers 6134, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sec:cnrepo:0115. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Agata Kwiek)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.