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Determinants of the Transition from Work into Retirement

  • Monika Riedel

    ()

    (Institute for Advanced Studies (IHS), Vienna)

  • Helmut Hofer

This NEUJOBS research report is concerned with determinants for planned retirement from work in European countries, using data from the 2006 ad hoc module of the European Labour Force Survey. The research uses multivariate analysis, taking into account factors that affect retirement planning including personal as well as workrelated characteristics, and some characteristics of national pension systems. In the context of the NEUJOBS project, the key conclusions of the report is that the interaction between planned retirement age and personal and work-related variables is not identical across Europe. Sex as well as country type need to be taken into consideration. Our results hint at EU states being in different phases of the transition from physically demanding to intellectually demanding work environments, which relates to earlier planned retirement where working is physically more demanding. This interpretation, however, is very tentative due to the crude identification of job characteristics via broad ISCO and NACE codes.

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Paper provided by The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria in its series NRN working papers with number 2013-10.

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Length: 51 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:jku:nrnwps:2013_10
Contact details of provider: Postal: NRN Labor Economics and the Welfare State, c/o Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz
Phone: +43-732-2468-8216
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  1. Rob Euwals & Daniel Vuuren & Ronald Wolthoff, 2010. "Early Retirement Behaviour in the Netherlands: Evidence From a Policy Reform," De Economist, Springer, vol. 158(3), pages 209-236, September.
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