IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/jlabrs/v50y2017i1d10.1007_s12651-017-0223-7.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Labour force activity after 65: what explain recent trends in Denmark, Germany and Sweden?
[Arbeitsmarktbeteiligung von über 65-Jährigen: Ursachen für die jüngsten Entwicklungstrends in Dänemark, Deutschland und Schweden]

Author

Listed:
  • Mona Larsen

    (SFI – Danish National Centre for Social Research)

  • Peder J. Pedersen

    (Aarhus University
    IZA)

Abstract

In most OECD member countries labour force attachment, has increased in recent years not only in the age groups 60–64 years but also among people 65 years and older. Focus in this paper is on the trend in older workers’ labour force participation in Denmark, Germany and Sweden since 2004. Main emphasis is given to people aged 65–69 years eligible for social security retirement programs from age 65. The gender aspect is included to accommodate different trends for women and men. To explain country differences in trends, the importance of changes in retirement policies of relevance for this age group and cohort relevant changes in education and health is examined and discussed. Further, country differences in the impact from education and health is examined. Results show that the largest increase in labour force participation among people aged 65–69 years has taken place in Sweden following by Germany, while the increase in Denmark is rather small. While the increase in Germany mainly seems to be a result of policy reforms, the increase in Sweden appear to be a result of a combination of policy changes and an increasing educational level. Financial incentives seem most important in Germany and only of minor importance in Denmark, where policy changes directed towards individuals above the age of 65 appear to have been too small so far to affect retirement behaviour significantly.

Suggested Citation

  • Mona Larsen & Peder J. Pedersen, 2017. "Labour force activity after 65: what explain recent trends in Denmark, Germany and Sweden? [Arbeitsmarktbeteiligung von über 65-Jährigen: Ursachen für die jüngsten Entwicklungstrends in Dänemark, D," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 50(1), pages 15-27, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabrs:v:50:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s12651-017-0223-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s12651-017-0223-7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12651-017-0223-7
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s12651-017-0223-7?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martina Eschelbach, 2011. "Labor supply after normal retirement age in Germany – A fourth pillar of retirement income?," Working Papers 106, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    2. Cai, Lixin, 2010. "The relationship between health and labour force participation: Evidence from a panel data simultaneous equation model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 77-90, January.
    3. Laun, Lisa, 2012. "The E ffect of Age-Targeted Tax Credits on Retirement Behavior," Research Papers in Economics 2012:14, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    4. Kathleen McGarry, 2004. "Health and Retirement: Do Changes in Health Affect Retirement Expectations?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
    5. Per Johansson & Lisa Laun & Mårten Palme, 2014. "Pathways to Retirement and the Role of Financial Incentives in Sweden," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Disability Insurance Programs and Retirement, pages 369-410, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Axel Börsch-Supan & Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Michela Coppola & Bettina Lamla, 2015. "Savings In Times Of Demographic Change: Lessons From The German Experience," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 807-829, September.
    7. Torben M. Andersen, 2015. "Robustness of the Danish Pension System," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 13(2), pages 25-30, 08.
    8. Mona Larsen & Peder Pedersen, 2013. "To work, to retire – or both? Labor market activity after 60," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-20, December.
    9. Tammy Schirle, 2008. "Why Have the Labor Force Participation Rates of Older Men Increased since the Mid-1990s?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(4), pages 549-594, October.
    10. Gary Burtless, 2013. "Can Educational Attainment Explain the Rise in Labor Force Participation at Older Ages?," Issues in Brief ib2013-13, Center for Retirement Research.
    11. Dwyer, Debra Sabatini & Mitchell, Olivia S., 1999. "Health problems as determinants of retirement: Are self-rated measures endogenous?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 173-193, April.
    12. Songül Tolan, 2015. "Die Flexibilisierung des Rentenübergangs in Deutschland," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 82, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    13. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Introduction to "Social Security and Retirement around the World"," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 1-35, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Gabriella Sjögren Lindquist & Eskil Wadensjö, 2009. "Retirement, Pensions and Work in Sweden," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 34(4), pages 578-590, October.
    15. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
    16. Hendrik P. Van Dalen & Kène Henkens & Joop Schippers, 2010. "How do employers cope with an ageing workforce?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(32), pages 1015-1036.
    17. Nicole Maestas & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2010. "How Longer Work Lives Ease the Crunch of Population Aging," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 139-160, Winter.
    18. David M. Blau & Ryan M. Goodstein, 2010. "Can Social Security Explain Trends in Labor Force Participation of Older Men in the United States?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
    19. Paul Bingley & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Peder J. Pedersen, 2004. "The Impact of Incentives on Retirement in Denmark," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 153-234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub99-1, September.
    21. Dominique Anxo & Thomas Ericson & Annie Jolivet, 2012. "Working longer in European countries: underestimated and unexpected effects," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(6), pages 612-628, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lorenz, Svenja & Zwick, Thomas, 2020. "Money also is sunny in a retiree's world," ZEW Discussion Papers 20-056, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    2. Pfister, Mona & Lorenz, Svenja & Zwick, Thomas, 2018. "Calculation of pension entitlements in the sample of integrated labour market biographies (SIAB)," FDZ Methodenreport 201801_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    3. Ashley McAllister & Theo Bodin & Henrik Brønnum-Hansen & Lisa Harber-Aschan & Ben Barr & Lee Bentley & Qing Liao & Natasja Koitzsch Jensen & Ingelise Andersen & Wen-Hao Chen & Karsten Thielen & Camero, 2020. "Inequalities in extending working lives beyond age 60 in Canada, Denmark, Sweden and England—By gender, level of education and health," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(8), pages 1-12, August.
    4. Paul Bingley & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Malene Kallestrup-Lamb & Peder J. Pedersen, 2019. "Labor Force Exit in Denmark 1980-2016: Impact from Changes in Incentives," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Reforms and Retirement Incentives, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Staubli, Stefan & Zweimüller, Josef, 2011. "Does Raising the Retirement Age Increase Employment of Older Workers?," IZA Discussion Papers 5863, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Doreen Wing Han Au & Thomas F. Crossley & Martin Schellhorn, 2005. "The effect of health changes and long‐term health on the work activity of older Canadians," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 999-1018, October.
    3. Axel Börsch-Supan & Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Felizia Hanemann, 2018. "Early Determinants of Work Disability in an International Perspective," NBER Working Papers 25142, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Mete, Cem & Schultz, T. Paul, 2002. "Health and Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Taiwan," Center Discussion Papers 28470, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
    5. Larsen, Mona & Pedersen, Peder J., 2012. "Paid Work after Retirement: Recent Trends in Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 6537, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Didier Blanchet & Thierry Debrand, 2007. "Souhaiter prendre sa retraite le plus tôt possible : santé, satisfaction au travail et facteurs monétaires," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 403(1), pages 39-62.
    7. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan & Pierre-Carl Michaud, 2011. "The Recent Evolution of Retirement Patterns in Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 287, McMaster University.
    8. Pamela Giustinelli & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2018. "SeaTE: Subjective ex ante Treatment Effect of Health on Retirement," Working Papers wp382, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    9. Laun, Lisa, 2017. "The effect of age-targeted tax credits on labor force participation of older workers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 102-118.
    10. Courtney C. Coile, 2015. "Economic Determinants Of Workers’ Retirement Decisions," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 830-853, September.
    11. Titus Galama & Arie Kapteyn & Raquel Fonseca & Pierre‐Carl Michaud, 2013. "A Health Production Model With Endogenous Retirement," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(8), pages 883-902, August.
    12. Rosa Aísa & Fernando Pueyo & Marcos Sanso, 2012. "Life expectancy and labor supply of the elderly," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 545-568, January.
    13. Axel Börsch-Supan & Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Felizia Hanemann, 2020. "Early Determinants of Work Disability in an International Perspective," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(5), pages 1853-1879, October.
    14. Pfister, Mona & Lorenz, Svenja & Zwick, Thomas, 2018. "Calculation of pension entitlements in the sample of integrated labour market biographies (SIAB)," FDZ Methodenreport 201801_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    15. Richard Blundell & Jack Britton & Monica Costa Dias & Eric French, 2017. "The impact of health on labour supply near retirement," IFS Working Papers W17/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    16. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Mona Larsen, 2010. "The impact of health on individual retirement plans: self‐reported versus diagnostic measures," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 792-813, July.
    17. Pérez, Carlos & Martín-Román, Ángel & Moral, Alfonso, 2020. "Two decades of the complementary leisure effect in Spain," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 15(C).
    18. Bakhtin, Maxim & Aleksandrova, Ekaterina, 2018. "Health and labor force participation of elderly Russians," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 49, pages 5-29.
    19. Maarten Lindeboom, 2012. "Health and Work of Older Workers," Chapters, in: Andrew M. Jones (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 3, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    20. Niels Vermeer & Maarten Rooij & Daniel Vuuren, 2019. "Retirement Age Preferences: The Role of Social Interactions and Anchoring at the Statutory Retirement Age," De Economist, Springer, vol. 167(4), pages 307-345, December.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jlabrs:v:50:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s12651-017-0223-7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.