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Money also is sunny in a retiree's world

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  • Lorenz, Svenja
  • Zwick, Thomas

Abstract

This paper shows that labor income plays an important positive role for the decision to work after retirement. Especially individuals who have the chance to substantially supplement their pension entitlements have a higher earnings elasticity. Men are more attracted by earnings incentives than women. Also individuals who work until retirement can easier be attracted by financial incentives to work after retirement than those with bridge options. Our analysis is based on a representative and large administrative individual career data set that includes employer information. We use an endogeneity correction model to estimate labor and non-labor financial determinants of labor market participation after retirement.

Suggested Citation

  • Lorenz, Svenja & Zwick, Thomas, 2020. "Money also is sunny in a retiree's world," ZEW Discussion Papers 20-056, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:20056
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    work after retirement; labor and non-labor financial incentives; empirical study;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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