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Financial Incentives to Postpone Retirement and Further Effects on Employment - Evidence from a Natural Experiment

  • Barbara Hanel

This paper examines the effect of the introduction of permanent benefit reductions for early retirees (i) on the duration until retirement entry and (ii) on the duration until exit from gainful employment. I estimate discrete time duration models using different error term specifications. Administrative data containing the full earnings history of the individuals are used. Since the reform implementing the benefit reductions was a natural experiment, a true causal effect can be identified. The permanent reduction of retirement benefit amounts causes a postponement of retirement entry by about fifteen months and a delay of employment exit by about nine months on average.

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File URL: http://www.bgpe.de/texte/DP/054_hanel.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE) in its series Working Papers with number 054.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: May 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bav:wpaper:054_hanel
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.bgpe.de/

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  1. Berkel, Barbara & Börsch-Supan, Axel, 2004. "Pension reform in Germany : the impact on retirement decisions," Papers 04-62, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
  2. Sewin Chan & Ann Huff Stevens, 2002. "How Does Job Loss Affect the Timing of Retirement?," NBER Working Papers 8780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hakola, Tuulia & Uusitalo, Roope, 2005. "Not so voluntary retirement decisions? Evidence from a pension reform," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(11-12), pages 2121-2136, December.
  4. Gary S. Fields & Olivia S. Mitchell, 1984. "Economic Determinants of the Optimal Retirement Age: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(2), pages 245-262.
  5. Krueger, Alan B & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1992. "The Effect of Social Security on Labor Supply: A Cohort Analysis of the Notch Generation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(4), pages 412-37, October.
  6. Stock, James H & Wise, David A, 1990. "Pensions, the Option Value of Work, and Retirement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1151-80, September.
  7. Gordon, Roger H. & Blinder, Alan S., 1980. "Market wages, reservation wages, and retirement decisions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 277-308, October.
  8. Axel Börsch-Supan & Barbara Berkel, 2004. "Pension Reform in Germany: The Impact on Retirement Decisions," MEA discussion paper series 04062, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  9. Barbara Berkel & Axel Börsch-Supan, 2004. "Pension Reform in Germany: The Impact on Retirement Decisions," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 60(3), pages 393-, September.
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