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Cross border flows, financial Intermediation and interactions of policy rules in a small open economy model

Author

Listed:
  • Ashima Goyal

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

  • Akhilesh K. Verma

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

Abstract

We present a small open economy New Keynesian model with financial intermediation to investigate the interaction between monetary policy and macroprudential regulations. Our model economy attempts to capture the vulnerability of emerging market economies in the face of external and domestic shocks. We build a model that closely captures the dynamics of emerging market economies to show that interest rate policy rules alone may not be an effective instrument to stabilize the economy under negative shocks. Monetary policy implementation through augmented Taylor rule (ATR) is an inadequate tool to absorb negative shocks given its conflict between inflation and exchange rate objectives. We show that the use of macroprudential regulations (MaPs) with simple Taylor rule improves business cycle dynamics relative to ATR under domestic and external shocks. We present two kinds of MaP regulations to show that they effectively mitigate losses during economic downturns and reduce excessive risk-taking behavior during economic booms when used along with a simple monetary policy rule (MP). In addition, we also conduct welfare evaluation that supports complementarity between MP and MaPs under different shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Ashima Goyal & Akhilesh K. Verma, 2020. "Cross border flows, financial Intermediation and interactions of policy rules in a small open economy model," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2020-008, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2020-008
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    File URL: http://www.igidr.ac.in/pdf/publication/WP-2020-008.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE model; cross border flows; monetary policy macroprudential regulation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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