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The Impact on Child Health from Access to Water and Sanitation and Other Socioeconomic Factors

In this paper we examine the impacts on child health, using diarrhoe as the health outcome (amongst children living in households), with access to different types of water and sanitation facilities, and from other socio-econoic and child specific factors. Using cross-sectional health survey data for India, we employ the propensity score method to match children belonging to different treatment groups, defined by water types and sanitation facilities, with children in a control group. We also employ non-matching techniques to compare our results and to check for their robustness. Our results indicate that disease-specific awareness has strong marginal effects on reducing the predicted probabilities of diarrhoeal outcomes in young children, which are consistent across the models utilised. We also find disease-specific awareness to have the largest impact on reducing the burden of disease from diarrhoea across a select group of predictors.

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Paper provided by Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies in its series IHEID Working Papers with number 02-2008.

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Length: 65
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision: Jan 2008
Handle: RePEc:gii:giihei:heidwp02-2008
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  7. Lokshin, Michael & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 2003. "Evaluating the impact of infrastructure rehabilitation projects on household welfare in rural Georgia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3155, The World Bank.
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  9. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Estimating the Benefit Incidence of an Antipoverty Program by Propensity Score Matching," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0873, Econometric Society.
  10. Cebu Study Team, 1992. "A child health production function estimated from longitudinal data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 323-351, April.
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  12. Cropper, M L, 1981. "Measuring the Benefits from Reduced Morbidity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(2), pages 235-40, May.
  13. Filmer, Deon & Pritchett, Lant, 1998. "Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data - or tears : with an application to educational enrollments in states of India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1994, The World Bank.
  14. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  15. Rao, Vijayendra & Ibanez, Ana Maria, 2003. "The social impact of social funds in Jamaica - a mixed-methods analysis of participation, targeting, and collective action in community-driven development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2970, The World Bank.
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