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Corporate lobbying: A review of the recent literature

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Abstract

This survey covers recent literature on lobbying, with particular focus on corporate lobbying. Three main research traditions --- contestsfor policy rent, persuasion games, and multiple means models --- are analyzed in detail. Various strategic aspects of lobbying arepresented in the context of a single unified model that encompasses both strategic communication and monetary contributions. Next, thereview investigates into three particular issues in the lobbying literature: (i) Incentive to lobby and the equilibrium amount of lobbying,both in the presence and absence of competitors, (ii) strategic substitution and complementarity of lobbying and contributions,and (iii) the role of intermediation in lobbying. Recent evidence from corporate lobbying is presented.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Gregor, 2011. "Corporate lobbying: A review of the recent literature," Working Papers IES 2011/32, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Nov 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:wpaper:wp2011_32
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    Cited by:

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    2. Grepperud, Sverre & Pedersen, Pål Andreas, 2020. "Positioning and negotiations: The case of pharmaceutical pricing," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    3. Henry L. Friedman & Mirko S. Heinle, 2020. "Influence Activities, Coalitions, and Uniform Policies: Implications for the Regulation of Financial Institutions," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(9), pages 4336-4358, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    lobbying; political contributions; menu auction; contest; persuasion;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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