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Revolving Door Lobbyists

  • Jordi Blanes i Vidal
  • Mirko Draca
  • Christian Fons-Rosen

Washington's "revolving door"––the movement from government service into the lobbying industry––is regarded as a major concern for policy-making. We study how ex-government staffers benefit from the personal connections acquired during their public service. Lobbyists with experience in the office of a US Senator suffer a 24 percent drop in generated revenue when that Senator leaves office. The effect is immediate, discontinuous around the exit period, and long-lasting. Consistent with the notion that lobbyists sell access to powerful politicians, the drop in revenue is increasing in the seniority of and committee assignments power held by the exiting politician.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.7.3731
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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aer/data/dec2012/20100920_data.zip
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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 102 (2012)
Issue (Month): 7 (December)
Pages: 3731-48

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:7:p:3731-48
Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.102.7.3731
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