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Advancing the Empirical Research on Lobbying

  • John M. de Figueiredo
  • Brian Kelleher Richter
Registered author(s):

    This essay identifies the empirical facts about lobbying which are generally agreed upon in the literature. It then discusses challenges to empirical research in lobbying and provides examples of empirical methods that can be employed to overcome these challenges--with an emphasis on statistical measurement, identification, and casual inference. The essay then discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and effective use of the main types of data available for research in lobbying. It closes by discussing a number of open questions for researchers in the field and avenues for future work to advance the empirical research in lobbying.

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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19698.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19698
    Note: LE PE POL
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    1. Bombardini, Matilde & Trebbi, Francesco, 2012. "Competition and political organization: Together or alone in lobbying for trade policy?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 18-26.
    2. Yael V. Hochberg & Paola Sapienza & Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2007. "A Lobbying Approach to Evaluating the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002," NBER Working Papers 12952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Nauro F. Campos & Francesco Giovannoni, 2006. "Lobbying, Corruption and Political Influence," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 06-14, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    4. Abadie, Alberto & Diamond, Alexis & Hainmueller, Jens, 2010. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California’s Tobacco Control Program," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 493-505.
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    6. Virginia Gray & David Lowery, 0. "The Density of State Interest-Communities: Do Regional Variables Matter?," Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(2), pages 61-79.
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    11. Stephen Ansolabehere & John M. de Figueiredo & James M. Snyder Jr, 2003. "Why is There so Little Money in U.S. Politics?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 105-130, Winter.
    12. Bombardini, Matilde & Trebbi, Francesco, 2011. "Votes or money? Theory and evidence from the US Congress," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 587-611, August.
    13. John M. Figueiredo & Emerson H. Tiller, 2001. "The Structure and Conduct of Corporate Lobbying: How Firms Lobby the Federal Communications Commission," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(1), pages 91-122, 03.
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    15. repec:cup:jfinqa:v:46:y:2011:i:06:p:1865-1891_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Angrist, Joshua & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 2010. "The Credibility Revolution in Empirical Economics: How Better Research Design Is Taking the Con out of Econometrics," IZA Discussion Papers 4800, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Seema Jayachandran, 2004. "The Jeffords Effect," UCLA Economics Online Papers 297, UCLA Department of Economics.
    18. Tomaso Duso, 2005. "Lobbying and regulation in a political economy: Evidence from the U.S. cellular industry," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 251-276, March.
    19. Katharina Schone & Wilfried Koch & Catherine Baumont, 2009. "Modelling local growth control decisions in a multi-city case: Do spatial interactions and lobbying efforts matter?," LEG - Document de travail - Economie 2009-11, LEG, Laboratoire d'Economie et de Gestion, CNRS, Université de Bourgogne.
    20. Eitan Goldman & Jörg Rocholl & Jongil So, 2009. "Do Politically Connected Boards Affect Firm Value?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2331-2360, June.
    21. Imbens, Guido W. & Lemieux, Thomas, 2008. "Regression discontinuity designs: A guide to practice," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 615-635, February.
    22. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    23. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule To Estimate The Effect Of Class Size On Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575, May.
    24. Jordi Blanes i Vidal & Mirko Draca & Christian Fons-Rosen, 2010. "Revolving Door Lobbyists," CEP Discussion Papers dp0993, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    25. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi & Francesco Trebbi, 2010. "The Political Economy of the US Mortgage Default Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 1967-98, December.
    26. Zimmermann, Klaus W. & Horgos, Daniel, 2008. "Interest Groups and Economic Performance: Some New Evidence," Working Paper 84/2008, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg.
    27. Stoyanov, Andrey, 2009. "Trade policy of a free trade agreement in the presence of foreign lobbying," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 37-49, February.
    28. Guy L. F. Holburn, 2004. "Influencing Agencies Through Pivotal Political Institutions," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 458-483, October.
    29. Amy McKay, 2011. "The decision to lobby bureaucrats," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 123-138, April.
    30. Jordi Blanes i Vidal & Mirko Draca & Christian Fons-Rosen, 2012. "Revolving Door Lobbyists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3731-48, December.
    31. Marianne Bertrand & Matilde Bombardini & Francesco Trebbi, 2011. "Is It Whom You Know or What You Know? An Empirical Assessment of the Lobbying Process," NBER Working Papers 16765, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    32. Alt, James E. & Carlsen, Fredrik & Heum, Per & Johansen, Kåre, 1999. "Asset Specificity and the Political Behavior of Firms: Lobbying for Subsidies in Norway," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(01), pages 99-116, December.
    33. Mara Faccio, 2006. "Politically Connected Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 369-386, March.
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