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Firm-Level Determinants Of Political Influence

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  • ALBERTO CHONG
  • MARK GRADSTEIN

Abstract

This paper uses a large cross-country survey of business firms to assess their influence on government policies. When controlling for endogeneity, we find that such an influence is associated with larger firms and to a lesser extent with government ownership, but not with the degree of competition. We also find that firms' perception of being politically influential is enhanced with the country's level of institutional quality. Copyright 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Chong & Mark Gradstein, 2010. "Firm-Level Determinants Of Political Influence," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 233-256, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecopol:v:22:y:2010:i:3:p:233-256
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    Cited by:

    1. Aisbett, Emma & McAusland, Carol, 2013. "Firm characteristics and influence on government rule-making: Theory and evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 214-235.
    2. Weymouth Stephen, 2013. "Firm lobbying and influence in developing countries: a multilevel approach," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 14(4), pages 1-26, January.
    3. Martin Gregor, 2011. "Corporate lobbying: A review of the recent literature," Working Papers IES 2011/32, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Nov 2011.
    4. Jeffrey Macher & John Mayo, 2012. "The World of Regulatory Influence," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 59-79, February.

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