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The great divergence(s)

Author

Listed:
  • Berlingieri, Giuseppe
  • Blanchenay, Patrick
  • Criscuolo, Chiara

Abstract

This report provides new evidence on the increasing dispersion in wages and productivity using novel micro-aggregated firm-level data from 16 countries. First, the report documents an increase in wage and productivity dispersions, for both manufacturing and market services (excluding the financial sector). Second, it shows that these trends are driven by differences within rather than across sectors, and that the increase in dispersion is mainly driven by the bottom of the distribution, while divergence at the top occurs only in the service sector, and only after 2005. Third, it suggests that between-firm wage dispersion is linked to increasing differences between high and low productivity firms. Fourth, it suggests that both globalisation and digitalisation imply higher wage divergence, but strengthen the link between productivity and wage dispersion. Finally, it offers preliminary analysis of the impact of minimum wage, employment protection legislation, trade union density, and coordination in wage setting on wage dispersion and its link to productivity dispersion.

Suggested Citation

  • Berlingieri, Giuseppe & Blanchenay, Patrick & Criscuolo, Chiara, 2017. "The great divergence(s)," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 83625, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:83625
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/83625/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yuichiro Matsumoto, 2018. "Endogenous Sunk Cost, Scale Economies, and Market Concentration," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 18-20, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    2. Ricardo Pinheiro Alves, 2017. "Portugal: a Paradox in Productivity," GEE Papers 0070, Gabinete de Estratégia e Estudos, Ministério da Economia, revised Jun 2017.
    3. Mauro Caselli & Stefano Schiavo & Lionel Nesta, 2017. "Markups and markdowns," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2017-11, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Emilien Gouin-Bonenfant, 2018. "Productivity Dispersion, Between-firm Competition and the Labor Share," 2018 Meeting Papers 1171, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Dan Andrews & Filippos Petroulakis, 2017. "Breaking the Shackles: Zombie Firms, Weak Banks and Depressed Restructuring in Europe," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1433, OECD Publishing.
    6. Koji Nakamura & Sohei Kaihatsu & Tomoyuki Yagi, 2018. "Productivity Improvement and Economic Growth," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 18-E-10, Bank of Japan.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    dispersion; productivity; sorting; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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